Rasmus Abel1

M, b. 1658, d. 1696
FatherMathias Abel1 b. c 1620, d. 1664
MotherKaren Rasmusdatter1 b. 15 Jan 1633, d. 20 Oct 1712
Birth*1658 Trondheim, Sor-Trøndelag, Norway1 
Death*1696 1 
Burial*12 Aug 1696 Stedje, Sogn i Fjordane1 

Citations

  1. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), Page 218-219.

Søren Abel1

M, b. 2 September 1698, d. 1746
FatherHans Mathiassøn Abel1 b. c 1654, d. Jul 1723
MotherClare Hanning1 b. Jun 1663, d. 1737
Birth*2 Sep 1698 Tysnes, Hordaland, Norway1 
Marriage*Jul 1737 Principal=Margarethe Hanning1 
Death*1746  
Burial*14 Mar 1746 Bergen, Hordaland, Norway1 

Family

Margarethe Hanning b. 1706, d. 3 Apr 1777

Citations

  1. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), Page 160-161.

(?) Abelsdatter1

F
FatherAbel Olufssøn1 b. c 1552, d. 1627
MotherElse Dideriksdatter1 b. c 1560?, d. a 1600
Marriage* Principal=Samuel Hanssøn Bugge 
Marriage*1624 Principal=Jens Anderssøn Buck1 

Family 1

Samuel Hanssøn Bugge b. 25 Sep 1605, d. 21 Aug 1663

Family 2

Jens Anderssøn Buck d. 1627

Citations

  1. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), page 344.

Anna Abelsdatter1

F, b. circa 1585, d. circa 1671
FatherAbel Olufssøn2 b. c 1552, d. 1627
MotherElse Dideriksdatter2 b. c 1560?, d. a 1600
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Jacob Aal Ottesen Stub (#1)
Pedigree for Jacob Aal Ottesen Stub (#2)
Pedigree for Jacob Aal Ottesen Stub (#3)
Birth*c 1585 1 
Marriage*c 1604 Principal=Christen Søfrenssøn Wittrup1 
Death*c 1671 Gloppen, Nordfjord, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway1 

Family

Christen Søfrenssøn Wittrup b. c 15 Apr 1576, d. 21 Jun 1636
Children

Citations

  1. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), page 305.
  2. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), page 344-345.
  3. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), page 306.
  4. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), page 305-306.

Jørgen Abelssøn1

M, b. circa 1598?, d. 1651
FatherAbel Olufssøn1 b. c 1552, d. 1627
MotherElse Dideriksdatter1 b. c 1560?, d. a 1600
Birth*c 1598? 1 
Marriage*b 1625 Principal=Lisbet Absalonsdatter Beyer1 
Employment*1630 Gloppen, Nordfjord, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway; Sogneprest i Gloppen1 
Death*1651 1 

Family

Lisbet Absalonsdatter Beyer

Citations

  1. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), page 344.

Mogens Abelssøn1

M
FatherAbel Olufssøn1 b. c 1552, d. 1627
MotherElse Dideriksdatter1 b. c 1560?, d. a 1600
Marriage*b 1614 Principal=Margrethe Johansdatter1 

Family

Margrethe Johansdatter

Citations

  1. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), page 344.

Jens Abildgaard1

M, d. circa 1712
Marriage*15 Apr 1694 Trondhjem, Sor-Trondelag, Norway; Principal=Hilleborg Bugge1 
Death*c 1712 probably died in Trondhjem. 

Family

Hilleborg Bugge

Citations

  1. [S640] P.C. B. Bondesen, Slœgten Bugge i Danmark og Norge (C. Schønemanns Gogtrykkeri., Nyborg, 1909), page 68.

John Singhuld Abrahamson1

M, b. 28 September 1889, d. 25 November 1959
Birth*28 Sep 1889 Sweden2 
Marriage*7 Sep 1921 Seattle, King Co., Washington; Principal=Louella Sophia Nord2 
Death*25 Nov 1959 Seattle, King Co., Washington2 

Family

Louella Sophia Nord b. 23 Dec 1902, d. 4 Dec 1991
Children
  • Jon William Robert Abrahamson2
  • James Leonard Abrahamson2
  • Shirley Luella Abrahamson2
  • Wallace Lloyd Abrahamson2
  • Lucia Lolita Abrahamson2
  • Jeanine Lucian Abrahamson2

Citations

  1. [S290] Lorraine Jacobs Dixie Hansen. 7/1/01,.
  2. [S290] Lorraine Jacobs Dixie Hansen. 7/1/01, Email on Nord Family, dated 5 April 2005, from Lorraine Jacobs to Robert Holmen.

Steven Abrahamson1

M, b. 29 July 1968
FatherWallace Lloyd Abrahamson1 b. 25 Nov 1928
MotherBonita S. Jolin1 b. 4 Dec 1929
Birth*29 Jul 1968 1 

Citations

  1. [S290] Lorraine Jacobs Dixie Hansen. 7/1/01, Email on Nord Family, dated 5 April 2005, from Lorraine Jacobs to Robert Holmen.

Lisbet Absalonsdatter Beyer1

F
Marriage*b 1625 Principal=Jørgen Abelssøn1 

Family

Jørgen Abelssøn b. c 1598?, d. 1651

Citations

  1. [S642] Gudrun Johnson Høibo., Minister Finn Korens Anebok (E. Sem A.A. Halden, 1958), page 344.

Thomas Ackley1

M
Marriage*a 1786 Bride=Olive Rowley2,3 

Family

Olive Rowley b. 11 Aug 1760

Citations

  1. [S8] Evelyn Burlingame., A Genealogical History of the Hubbard Family and Allied Steele and Rowley Families (Unpublished 1975),.
  2. [S157] H.S. Russell, Descendants of Moses Rowley - Cape Cod, Mass., About 1715 - Also Descendants of George Warner - Wittenborg, Germany Born 1720 (Printed for private circulation, 1908, Pittsfield, Mass), p 5.
  3. [S386] Homer W. Brainard, "Henry Rowley and Some of His Descendants," The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol 37 (1906): in 4 parts: p57-66;97-103;203-208;251-256, p. 206.

William Adam1

M
Residence* of Suffield1 
Marriage*23 Dec 1692 Principal=Joanna Dibble1 

Family

Joanna Dibble b. 14 Oct 1672, d. 15 Nov 1711

Citations

  1. [S392] Jr. Van Buren Lamb., Dibble Genealogy - Your Ancestors (as extracted by E.H. Wagener (not seen)),.

(?) Adams1

M
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams1 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherMary Ann Budington1 b. 16 May 1809, d. c 1844
Death* Died as an infant.1 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.

Aaron Adams1

M, b. 22 February 1775, d. 22 August 1821
FatherJoseph Adams b. c 1740, d. 18 May 1826
MotherJoanna Disbrow b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Frank Valentine Hubbard
Biography* JAF: My father was a Yankee whose forefathers came from England when the American Colonies were new.

...my father was a large fine looking man, with blue eyes and dark hair.

2 
Birth*22 Feb 1775 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA3,4,5,6 
Baptism16 Jul 1775 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA7,5,6 
(Witness) Baptism14 Jun 1799 Ulster Co., New York, USA; Sponsors are Arie Adams and Elisabeth Bonesteel. (Elisabeth is neice to David Bonesteel).; Principal=Elisabeth Bonesteel8 
Residenceb 1800 Pine Hill, Shandaken, Ulster Co., New York; It was before 1800 that Aaron Adams made the first clearing in Pine Hill.

Described by daughter Joanna:
My father built a large house at the foot of Pine hill on a road called a turnpike, and in the background, were large hills covered with great pine and hemlock trees. A spring from the mountain side came trickling down on one side of the house from which we had pure water to use. Old Shenandoah creek also ran by, and many happy days in my childhood I spent fishing for the speckled trout that lived in the clear waters. The country was new and the most of the dwellings were built of logs, so my fathers large house seemed like a mansion in my childish imagination. It was a white two story building with a wide veranda in front, and as my father was a regular Yankee for invention, he put his house in good use in many ways. In the front were two large rooms, of which one was kept as a general store, and the other a bar room, for he kept the only public house for miles around. Many travelers partook of the good cheer in this old fashioned house where in cold weather they sat around the blazing logs in a great fire place, and neighbors would gather in the long evenings, and many a story would be told by the early settlers of hardships and adventures with the red men of the forest. Back of these were the living rooms of the family, and in the rear was a great kitchen and out buildings also sleeping rooms for the black folks, who did all the work.

The country post office was in one corner of the store, and the mail was carried by a man on horse back. Near by he kept a blacksmith shop for his own use and also his neighbors.

The rural life at home made me very happy, and I could climb the rocky hill side and fish for trout in the clear water of Shenlaken creek. In the evening you could hear the panthers scream in the forest, but it was music to my ears.2,9 
Biography1800 Pine Hill, Shandaken, Ulster Co., New York; Supervisor Adams resided at Pine Hill. He settled there and made the first clearing, before the year 1800. About 1810, he built a hotel on the site down occupied by Billor's summer hotel, formerly known as "Glenn Hal," and continued to reside there, keeping tavern, until about 1816, when he moved away and settled near Rochester, N.Y. Adams served one term in the Legislature while he lived at Pine Hill; he was a good fiddler and a man of energy. He was also the first postmaster of Pine Hill, but at that time there were only three post-offices in the town. Pine Hill, Aaron Adams postmaster, one at the O'Neil place now owned by Giles Whitney, between Shandaken and Phoenicia, Henry W. Rogers postmaster, and The Corners, Lazarus Sprague postmaster.

10 
Marriage1801 Aaron Adams and Elizabeth Bonesteel of Sopus were married in 1801.; Principal=Elisabeth Bonesteel11,12 
Employmentbt 1810 - 1815 #37 Main Street, Pine Hill, Ulster Co., New York; Inn Keeper - Pine Tavern - Aaron Adams (later known as Colonial Inn, Billors, and Glen Hall)

On current map: corner of Elm and Old Highway 28 (#37 Main).

Aaron Adams. The upper two-story portion of the building was the structure put up by Adams about 1800. It was kept by a John Higgines when Mr. Adams left, then by Samuel Smith, Ezekial Grifin, and then by a Frenchman, Strattabus, who rebuilt it. During this time it became the Billors. It then passed into the hands of Thomas and Floyd Smith and then on to Mrs. Mahala Floyd who, in 1874, erected "Glen Hall." It was advertised as follows:

"The brooks are filled with trout and the woods with game. The locality invites equally the sportsman, the invalid and the pleasureseeker. Glen Hall is a new and commodious Family Hotel, newly and completely furnished, surrounded by pleasant grounds, has extensive verandas, unusally large and well-ventilated rooms; livery and new Billiard room and is in every way calculated to afford an agreeable summer home. Location unexceptionable. Accomodation superior; prices reasonable."

It was then owned by A.D. Hill and later by Mr. Ralph Dalton, who developed the ski slope behind it. It is on Main Street.

The author of "Pine Hill Kawiensinck" indicates that the description she got for this (and other structures) in Pine Hill came from a booklet published by the U&D Railroad in 1883, "Pine Hill To Summit."

[Henry Griiffeth - author of Chapter XXX on the Town of Shandaken]:
At the time Adams lived at Pine Hill there was little there except his tavern and a saw-mill set down in a small clearing. His tavern was a frame building, lathed and plastered, and was the first building of the kind built in the town. People came from miles around to see it; it was such a curiosity. All other houses in the town at that time were constructed of logs. The tavern at Pine Hill, after Adams left, was kept by John Higgins, father of the late Marical Higgens; then by Samuel Smith, then by Ezekial Griffin, father of the late Matthew Griffin; then by one Strattabus, a Frenchman, who rebuilt it. In after years it passed into the hands of the late Thomas and Floyd Smith, and finally to Mrs. Mabala Floyd, who in 1874 erected "Glen Hall," and the old Pine Tavern, to well and widely known for many years, passed away.
9 
Employmentbt 1810 - 1815 Shandaken, Ulster Co., New York; Shandaken Town Supervisor. [Benjamin] Milk continued to represent the town [Shankaken] as its Supervisor until 1810, when Aaron Adams was chosen and re-elected till 1816; when he was succeeded by Henry W. Rogers.9,10 
Employment* Albany, Albany Co., New York, USA; A member of the NY State Legislature.

JAF: One incident impressed upon my mind, in the year after I came back, (that is) the work of my mother in getting my father ready to go to Albany in the fall as he was elected to go to the Legislature. The summer before a first class woman for the work was brought to the house to spin the fine yarn to make the cloth fit to be made into clothes. When the yarn was ready it was taken to the weavers. From there it went to the Dyers to be colored a dark brown, and then to the Fullers to be pressed and fulled. Then a journey had to be made to town to get the cloth for shirts, and to get shoes and knee buckles, also trimming and linings for the clothes. A woman tailoress was brought to the house, who used to sit day after day, and stitch for several weeks and as fast as she sewed a seam, she put a press board across her lap, and taken the iron goose from before the fire and press the seam flat. A sewing machine was never dreamed of in those days. At last the clothes were finished, and it was time to go, and as there were no railroads in those days, my father had Prince drive the horses before the carriage and take him and his carpet bag to Albany. We children were very proud of father and we looked with admiration on him, dressed so fine. I well remember the trousers which came only to his knees, and how the silver buckles shone and his shoes also with bright buckles on top. He had a long vest and a white ruffled shirt, also ruffles at the wrist and his long curling hair was braided and tied with a black ribbon. The overcoat was called then a great coat, and was made of the same clothes his clothes, and lined with flannel and wadded warmly as the climate was cold in the winter. DeWitt Clinton was then Governor of New York. While he was in the legislature the bill came before the house to put in a canal, from Lake Erie to the Atlantic. When the vote was called, my fathers name commencing with "A" was one of the first. When Adams was called, he got up and responded with great dignity, his answer which was "Nay".

That winter my father was in Albany he came home sick, about the time for the Holidays. The Doctor said he had a high fever and his head had to be shaved. By the time he got well and able to go back, his hair was too short to braid into a queue. 'Do he bought a braid of false hair which was often done in those days. When he got back to Albany, it had gone out of fashion for men to wear their hair long, so his false hair was of no use. Every one had their hair cut off, so he was just in the style.

Dixie Hansen: DeWitt Clinton served 2 terms at Governor of NY: 1817-1822; 1825-1828. If Aaron was in the legislature during the first term, then the families move to Genesee Country must have occurred later than the 1815-1817 date that Joannah estimated in her story.2,9 
Milit-Beg*1812 War of 1812

Joannah Adams Frank:

About that time the war of 1812 broke out and there was a draft made by the government and many of our neighbors elected to go. Their wives and mothers used to come to our house and urge my father to go with them, but he could not be taken with them in the army as he had a broken arm once which made it crooked, and of course unfit for service. It always bothered him and made him unfit for doing any sort of work. When they were all ready to go, they met at our house with the Officers who came to go with them, and all of the women and children came to bid them good bye. They had to go by team 35 miles to get to the river, where they were to take a boat for the city of New York. The women cried, and said "Oh Judge Adams if you would only go with them, we would go home satisfied." That night after they were gone and my Father was in bed and asleep, he suddenly woke up and it all at once occurred to him that it was his duty to go with these good neighbors. He had a chance to in the capacity of a subtler to the regiment. He woke up my mother and said "Betsey I think I must go with the regiment to the seat of war". He waked up Prince, and had the horses put before the old carriage at once, and throwing a few things in a carpet bag, he started for Sopus, where he took a boat for New York City. The troops were in camp at Staten Island being drilled for war. He reached the regiment and at once got a position as subtler greatly to the joy of his friends. He had not been away only about six weeks when peace was declared and the men were discharged and sent home without even having been in a battle. When it was heard What day they would be expected home, all the women and children met at our house to meet them. There was a great rejoicing when they came and a mixture of laughter and tears for everyone was so glad the war was over. The day they were expected we were all outside to see the first sight of them. When we saw the soldiers coming up the rise of ground in front of the house, the children at our house ran as fast as they could shouting "Pappy, Pappy, oh Pappy has come" and the black folks too all outside to see Massa Adams, for he was beloved by both black and white. 
Residence*bt 1814 - 1815 Mt. Morris, Genesee Co., New York, USA; Moved from Pine Hill in the Livingston Manor of Sullivan (formerly Ulster Co.) NY to Mt. Morris in the Genesee Valley [in 2003 this is Livingston Co.] in about 1814 or 1815.2 
Deathc 1816 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA; Died from typhus fever.

JAF: Shortly after her death, my father was taken sick with the same fever and in two weeks after my mother died we were all standing around his bed and he was breathing his last. He was laid away by my mother that mark their resting place.

My father had his mind up to the last breath and talked to my sister Laura and myself giving us all the advice he was able as to our course of action when we were left alone. He could not tell us just what we should do, as he did not know himself. All he could say was that he left us in the hands of a wise and good God, to guide us in the future. My father held to the faith of the Universalist church, and very strong in his belief. A few days after his death the Presbyterian Minister from Mt. Morris came to console us and made a long prayer to God to watch over us and then he exorted us to become good Christians and not follow our fathers example. "Why girls," he said, "You have no reason to believe only that your father is amongst the dammed in Hell." Now that was not very consoling when we were in such trouble and did not know what to do. A long time before Prince had run away and Sarah and all her family had gone (as she was a free negro) and poor Tom took sick and died, so we children were left all alone in the wilderness.
2 
Burial* Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA2 
Note*Apr 1819 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA; Elected as an Assessor, as a Commissioner of Common Schools, and as a Fence Viewer at the first town meeting in Mt. Morris13 
Land Tx1 Jun 1820 Mt. Morris, Genesee Co., New York; Indenture dated 1 June 1820 (recorded 26 October 1830)

Grantors: Benjamin W. Rogers and Catherine Cecilia, his wife, as trustees for Mary Murray, Hannah L. Murray, Thomas L. Ogden, and Benjamin Rodgers all of whom were creditors of John R. Murray and William Ogden (all of City and Co. of NY)

Grantee: Aaron Adams of Mt. Morris in county of Genesee [note: in 2003 this is Livingston Co.].

43 acres on the north side of of lot 159 and 57 acres on the south side of lot 151 in Mt. Morris, Genesee Co., NY.

$575.86 
Death*22 Aug 1821 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co.,, New York, USA3,14,15 
Burial Old Cemetery, Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York15 
Inventory*29 May 1822 Groveland, Livingston Co., New York; The People of the State of New York by the grace of God, Free and Independent

To Eli Lake friend to Aaron Adams late of the Town of Mt. Morris Deceased

Whereas the said Aaron Adams, as is alegded, died Intestate; having whilest living, and at the time of his death, Goods, Chattels, or Credits within this State by means whereof the granting Administration, and also the auditing, allowing and final discharging the account thereof doth appertain unto us - and we, being desirous that the Goods, Cahttels and Credits of the said deceased may be well and faithfully Administered, applied and disposed of do grant unto the said Eli Lake full power by these presents, to Administer and faithfully dispose of all and singular the said Goods Chattels and Credits, to ask, demand, recover and receive the debts which unto the the said deceased whilest living, and at the time of his death did belong; and to pay the debts which the said deceased did owe, so far as such Goods, Chattels and Credits will thereunto entend, and the Law require: hereby requiring you to make or cause to be made a true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the Goods Chattels and Credits of the said deceased, which have or shall come to your hands possession or knowledge, and the same so made, to eshitrit or cause to be eschitrited, into the office of Surrogate of the County of Livingston at or before the expiration of six callender Months from the date hereof; and also to render a just and true account of administration, when there unto required. And we do these presents depute, constitute and appoint you the said Eli Lake administrator of all and singular the Goods, Chattels and Credits which were of the said Aaron Adams deceased.

In Testimony whereof, we have caused the seal of office of our said Surrogate to be hereunto affixed.

Witness James Rosebrugh Esquire Surrogate of our said County at Groveland the twenty ninth day of May in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty two, and of our Independence the forth sixth year.

Jas Rosebrugh16 

Family

Elisabeth Bonesteel b. 17 Jan 1782, d. 29 Jul 1821
Marriage1801 Aaron Adams and Elizabeth Bonesteel of Sopus were married in 1801.; Principal=Elisabeth Bonesteel11,12 
Children

Citations

  1. [S180] Author Unknown, Brief "Adams" Genealogy (unpublished notes in possession of Dixie Hansen), Date Unknown,.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S203] Bible owned by Philip Bonesteel (first owner) and Sarah Bonesteel of Victor NY (last owner), Hand-type transcript only. I have not seen the original bible or a facsimilie.. (Published in NY, 1809 by William Elliott and Robert Eastburn);.
  4. [S204] Town Records of Redding, Fairfield Co., CT,.
  5. [S210] Michael S. Disbrow., Descendants of Thomas and Mercy (Holbridge) Disbrow (Disbrow Family Association, 1992),.
  6. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 12.
  7. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.
  8. [S207] Index, "Index to baptisms and marriages of Katsbaan and Saugerties Reformed Church, 1730-1801 as printed in old Ulster volumns (sic) 7-8-9," (1981),.
  9. [S394] Nancy T. Smith, Pine Hill Kawiensinck (1976; Illustrations by Millie Jocelyn),.
  10. [S396] Alphonso t. Clearweater., History of Ulster Co. (1907),.
  11. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911, p1.
  12. [S551] Frances "Fannie" (Rowe) Buxton to Marian (Wright) Smith. 12 December 1944, Fullerton, California. (2008 / Barbara (Walls) Hanson).
  13. [S353] James H. Smith, History of Livingston County New York with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers, (D. Mason and Co., Syracuse, NY; 1881),.
  14. [S441] Livingston Co., NY Burial Index Cards - A card file index from a cemetery reading of legible cemetery markers in Livinston Co., prior to 1885, Died 8/22/1821 - 46 yrs 6 mos. Mt. Morris - Old Cemetery.
  15. [S422] Tombstone, Old Cemetery at intersection of Chapel St. and Conkey, Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., NY; Dixie Hansen in May 2003.
  16. [S395] Aaron Adams, 29 May 1822,.
  17. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911, p 1.

Aaron Adams

M, b. circa 1849
FatherWilliam Henry Harrison Adams b. c 1814
MotherLuzette (?) b. c 1822
Birth*c 1849 New York 
Residence*1850 Spencer, Tioga Co., New York; Age 1. Name is hard to read. Could be "Mason" instead of Aaron.1 

Citations

  1. [S338] 1850 US Census, Spencer, Tioga Co., New York.

Aaron Bonesteel Adams1

M, b. 1806, d. 19 January 1865
FatherAaron Adams1,2 b. 22 Feb 1775, d. 22 Aug 1821
MotherElisabeth Bonesteel b. 17 Jan 1782, d. 29 Jul 1821
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Frank Valentine Hubbard
Residence* Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA2 
Biography* JAF : My brother was never the gentleman my father was for although as he grew up, he was a generous and whole souled fellow, he was a rough fun loving man.

I don't think I could have learned much at school, and it could not be seen that my brother Aaron had learned anything. I shed a great many tears over him as I used to have a terrible time to coax him to go to school with me. He could not bear the restraint of a school room, so he never became much of a scholar, but was always noted for his quick wit, and ready answer to any question asked him. He was always good natured, and very generous and kind hearted and full of fun. After he grew up he spent much of his time in different sorts of amusement and sports. Running horses was one of his favorite pastimes. He was never lucky in his bets on a race but more often was a loser, so he never had much money. Poor Aaron, the ups and downs of his life would fill a book if written. It was closed the time of the great rebellion in the 60's where he was a soldier and died in a hospital and his remains lie in a cemetery at Evansville Indiana.3 
Birth Connecticut4 
Birth*1806 Foot of Pine Hill, Ulster Co., New York5 
Birthc 1808 New York6,7,8,9,10,11 
Marriage*c 1826 near Mount Morris, Livingston Co., New York; Principal=Mary Ann Budington2,12,13,5 
Land Tx*19 Oct 1830 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York; Indenture made 19 October 1830

Grantor: Aaron Adams and Mary E., his wife

Grantee: Gaylord Willsey of Candon, Tioga Co., NY

12.5 acres in Lots 159 and 151 of Mt. Morris Tract in Livingston Co., NY.

$150.

; Principal=Mary Ann Budington, Witness=Gaylord Willsey14 
Residencea 1833 Flint?, Michigan; Joannah Adams moved with her Aunt and Uncle to Keene, New Hampshire where her Uncle had work in a large glass factory. During that time, her father Aaron sold his 40 acres in Mt. Morris and moved to a part of Michigan which was then a new country and in a dense forest... possibly near Flint.2 
Marriage30 Apr 1848 Utica, Winnebago Co., Wisconsin, USA; Principal=Rebecca Bowls15 
Residence1850 Utica, Winnebago Co., Ohio, USA; Farmer. Value of Real Estate owned = $1,5007 
Marriage*27 Apr 1850 Utica, Winnebago Co, Wisconsin, USA; Cherie Pennau [cheriep@new.rr.com] did an onsite look-up in the court records and transcribed the following:

L.B. Adams married Rebecca Brown
Date of Marriage: 4-29-1850
Vol. 01, Page 028, Doc# 0116

29 April 1850

This is to certify that L.B. Adams and Rebecca C. Brown, both of the Town of Utica, Winnebago county, and state of Wisconsin came before me, a Justice of the Peace in said county and after having examined L.B. Adams on oath and found no legal impediment to their being united in marriage and was married on the 27th of April 1850 in the presence of John C. Welsh and Caroline Welsh as witnesses.
Utica, April 29, 1850
E.R. Baldwin
Esq Clerk Curcuit Court
Lloyd Chafee, Justice of Peace; Principal=Rebecca Bowls2,16 
Residence1860 Utica, Winnebago Co., Wisconsin, USA; Farmer. Value of Real Estate owned = $2,000; Personal estate valued at $5006 
Milit-Beg*11 Mar 1864 Oshkosh, Wisconsin, USA; Enlisted at Oshkosh WI on 11 March 1864 for a 3-year term. Was a private in Company D of the 8th regiment of Wisconsin volunteers, commanded by Captain Benjamin Williams Robins and served for 10 months and 10 days, dying at Jeffersonville IN on or about the 21st of January 1865.17 
ResidenceJan 1865 Cumberland General Hospital, Nashville, Tennessee, USA18 
Death*19 Jan 1865 Jefferson General Hospital, Jeffersonville, Clark Co., Indiana, USA; Variously reported cause of death: consumption, pneumonia and scurvy, and inflammation of lungs.

Joannah Elizabeth Rowe:

It was only a few times in my life that I ever saw my father Aaron Bonesteel Adams. After he left little Walter with his Aunt Joannah, he went off west and it was a few years that we heard nothing from him. I think it was about six years after my mothers death that he married again. She was a widow by the name of Brown and had a family, six children mostly grown up. She had a farm at a place called Omro in Wisconsin not many miles from Oshkosh. He went there and lived, and helped work the farm. In this marriage there were two children, a boy Frank and a girl Charlotte. I was there when they were small but don't know what ever became of them. When the Civil War broke out in 1861, the two oldest of the Brown boys enlisted, and my father went into the army with them. In a year after he was taken sick and died in a hospital in Evansville, Indiana and his remains lie in an unknown grave. I have often remembered him on Decoration days and hung up a wreath with his name, on the monument for the unknown.

Letter from his pension file:

Jefferson Gen Hospital
Jeffersonville Ind
January 21/65

Rebecca Adams
Fiscorners Wis

It becomes my painful duty to inform you that Aaron B. Adams Co. D 8 Wis Vols died in this hopsital today of Consumption. enclosed you will find two receipts of his effects which you are requested to sign and return the same to this Office with proper directions for their transmittal to you by express. for all further information you will address Chaplain C.W. Fitch at this hospital.
Respectfully,
S.H. Morrison
2nd Lt (?)2,19,20 
Burial* New Albany National Cemetery, New Albany, Floyd Co., Indiana; Section B, Site 54321

Family 1

Mary Ann Budington b. 16 May 1809, d. c 1844
Marriage*c 1826 near Mount Morris, Livingston Co., New York; Principal=Mary Ann Budington2,12,13,5 
Children

Family 2

Rebecca Bowls b. c 1816
Marriage30 Apr 1848 Utica, Winnebago Co., Wisconsin, USA; Principal=Rebecca Bowls15 
Marriage*27 Apr 1850 Utica, Winnebago Co, Wisconsin, USA; Cherie Pennau [cheriep@new.rr.com] did an onsite look-up in the court records and transcribed the following:

L.B. Adams married Rebecca Brown
Date of Marriage: 4-29-1850
Vol. 01, Page 028, Doc# 0116

29 April 1850

This is to certify that L.B. Adams and Rebecca C. Brown, both of the Town of Utica, Winnebago county, and state of Wisconsin came before me, a Justice of the Peace in said county and after having examined L.B. Adams on oath and found no legal impediment to their being united in marriage and was married on the 27th of April 1850 in the presence of John C. Welsh and Caroline Welsh as witnesses.
Utica, April 29, 1850
E.R. Baldwin
Esq Clerk Curcuit Court
Lloyd Chafee, Justice of Peace; Principal=Rebecca Bowls2,16 
Children

Citations

  1. [S180] Author Unknown, Brief "Adams" Genealogy (unpublished notes in possession of Dixie Hansen), Date Unknown,.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911, p 1.
  4. [S192] 1905 Minnesota State Census, MN, FamilySearch.org,.
  5. [S551] Frances "Fannie" (Rowe) Buxton to Marian (Wright) Smith. 12 December 1944, Fullerton, California. (2008 / Barbara (Walls) Hanson).
  6. [S18] 1860 US Census, WI, Winnebago Co., Page 58, Family of A.B. Adams on lines 30-37.
  7. [S22] 1850 US Census, Wisconsin, Winnebago Co., Town of Utica.
  8. [S182] 1885 Minnesota State Census,.
  9. [S189] 1875 Minnesota State Census,.
  10. [S190] 1880 US Census, MN,.
  11. [S223] Joannah E. Row, Death Certificate 1673, 1 March 1915,.
  12. [S392] Jr. Van Buren Lamb., Dibble Genealogy - Your Ancestors (as extracted by E.H. Wagener (not seen)),.
  13. [S404] Assisted by Ruth Buddington Leighton Richard Walter Nielson, The Budington Buddington Family (Nielson Publishing Co., 1989, 830p), page 108, 173.
  14. [S421] , 19 October 1830, Volume 8, page 427.
  15. [S334] Aaron B. Adams; Certificate # 106549; US Civil War Pensions; There is some contradiction on the date of this marriage. While actual court records report a marriage of "L.B." Adams and Rebecca Brown on 27 April 1850 by Justice of the Peace, Lloyd Chafee, Aaron Adams' pension files include a statement that no records of the marriage of Aaron and Rebecca could be found in Winnebago Co. and also include an affidavit by Lloyd Chafee (dated 24 February 1865) that he was present and solemnized the marriage on 30 April 1848. There is also an 1865 affidavit by Rebecca herself (then still Adams) certifying the date of the marriage as 20 April 1848.

    While it seems most likely that Aaron's name was misrecorded as "L.B. Adams" instead of "A.B. Adams" (thus causing the "no record found by the register) and that the marriage did occur in 1850 rather than 1848, it is also easily possible to conclude otherwise.
  16. [S270] Cherie Pennau Dixie Hansen. 19 June 2001, e-mail address. Vol 1, Page 028, Doc #0116 - Winnebago Co., WI Marriage Records.
  17. [S334] Aaron B. Adams; Certificate # 106549; US Civil War Pensions;.
  18. [S334] Aaron B. Adams; Certificate # 106549; US Civil War Pensions; Pension files indicate that Aaron Adams was discharged from Cumberland Hospital in Nashville Tenn and was admitted to Jefferson General Hospital in Jeffersonville IN on 10 January 1865. It indicates that he died on January 19th 1865. Other records in the same files indicate that the day of death was 20 January 1865.
  19. [S269] Historical Data Systems., American Civil War Regiments Online Database at Ancestry.com (Kingston, NY), Source cited in this database is Roster of Wisconsin Volunteers: War of the Rebellion.
  20. [S334] Aaron B. Adams; Certificate # 106549; US Civil War Pensions; Jeffereson General Hospital
    Jeffersonville Ind.
    January 21 / 65

    Rebecca Adams
    Fiscorners [Fisks Corners] Wis

    It becomes my painful duty to inform you that Aaron B. Adams, Co. D 8 Wis Vols died in this hospital today of Consumption, enclosed you will find two receipts of his effects which you are requested to sign and return the same to this Office with proper directions for their transmittal to you by express. for all further Information you will address Chaplain C.W. Fitch at this hospital
    Respectfully

    S.H. Morrison
    2nd Lt. [?]

    Note that the date of death is elsewhere reported as having occurred on 19 January and 20 January 1865.
  21. [S583] Find A Grave Website (www.findagrave.com), Aaron Adams, died 20 Jan 1865, buried at New ALbany National Cemetery in New Albany, Floyd Co., Indiana; Memorial #29276906.
  22. [S22] 1850 US Census, Wisconsin,.

Abel Adams1

M
FatherAbraham Adams1 d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams1 d. 1789
Note*3 Feb 1767 chose Timothy Lyon for guardian1 
Marriage*25 Nov 1773 Easton; Principal=Lucretia Crane1 

Family

Lucretia Crane

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.

Abigail Adams1

F, b. 1 October 1767
FatherJoseph Adams1 b. c 1740, d. 18 May 1826
MotherJoanna Disbrow1 b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829
Biography* had descendants at Barton and Halsey Valley, NY.2,3 
Married Name Taylor1 
Marriage* Principal=(?) Taylor1,2 
Birth*1 Oct 1767 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA4,2,5 
Baptism6 Mar 1768 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA6,2,5 

Family

(?) Taylor

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S210] Michael S. Disbrow., Descendants of Thomas and Mercy (Holbridge) Disbrow (Disbrow Family Association, 1992),.
  3. [S398] Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume I Adams-Gates (Genealgocial Publishing Co., Inc. 1983), section written by William H. Upton; Walla Walla, W.T.
  4. [S204] Town Records of Redding, Fairfield Co., CT,.
  5. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 12.
  6. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.

Abraham Adams1,2

M, d. 11 June 1761
FatherDaniel Adams3 b. 17 May 1679
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Frank Valentine Hubbard
Note* It is not clear whether Abraham's mother is Sarah or whether it is Rebecca.4 
Marriage*9 May 1740 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; Principal=Elizabeth Williams3 
Death*11 Jun 1761 Died in the French and Indian War; reported dead 11 June 1761 in roll of Col. Smedley's Co.3 

Family

Elizabeth Williams d. 1789
Children

Citations

  1. [S195] William Edgar Grumman, The Revolutionary Soldiers of Redding Connecticut and the Record of Their Services (Hartford Press, 1904),.
  2. [S210] Michael S. Disbrow., Descendants of Thomas and Mercy (Holbridge) Disbrow (Disbrow Family Association, 1992),.
  3. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.
  4. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 7.
  5. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.

Abraham Adams1

M, b. 2 December 1745
FatherAbraham Adams1 d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams d. 1789
Milit-Beg* Connecticut; Rev Soliders of Redding CT: Abraham Adams was a member of Capt. Zalmon Read's company, in the 5th Regt. Conn. Line, commanded by Col. David Waterbury, which served around New York and in the Northern Department in 1775, and took part in the operations at St. Johns and Montreal: He was discharged from this service Nov. 28, 1775. He next served as private in Capt. Ezekiel Sanford's company, 5th Regt. Conn Continental Line (formation of 1777-81), Col. Philip B. Bradley commanding; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777, for 8 months; discharged Jan. 9, 1778. He was pensioned under the Act of June 7, 1832, for 13 months actual service in the Conn. troops, and received an annual allowarce of $43.33 from March 4, 1831.2 
Biography* Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; History of Redding CT: Abraham Adams, brother of Joseph, was contemporary with him in Redding and lived where Joseph Hill now resides. His wife was Sarah ____. Their children were: Ann, baptized March 6, 1768; Deborah, baptized April 28, 1771; Sarah, baptized July 31, 1774, died in infancy; Sarah, baptized October 20, 1776; Eli, baptized January 30, 1780. Family record mentions a son Abraham. This family probably removed to the West.1 
Residence* Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA1 
Marriage* Principal=Deborah (?)3 
Birth*2 Dec 1745 date from pension records (Families of Old Fairfield)1,2 
Marriage*a 23 Jun 1766 Principal=Sarah (?)1,3 
Milit-End*9 Jan 1778 2 

Family 1

Deborah (?) d. 23 Jun 1766
Marriage* Principal=Deborah (?)3 

Family 2

Sarah (?)
Marriage*a 23 Jun 1766 Principal=Sarah (?)1,3 

Citations

  1. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.
  2. [S195] William Edgar Grumman, The Revolutionary Soldiers of Redding Connecticut and the Record of Their Services (Hartford Press, 1904),.
  3. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.

Abraham Adams1

M
FatherEdward Adams1 d. 1671
MotherMary (?)1
Marriage* Principal=Martha Hobby1 

Family

Martha Hobby

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.

Alice Adams1

F, b. circa 1859
FatherLawrence Dazang Adams1 b. c 1837, d. 27 Mar 1911
MotherLottie (?)2
Married Name Leonard1 
Birth*c 1859 Ontario, Canada2 
Marriage*23 Apr 1883 Belleville, Ontario, Canada; Principal=Robert John Leonard1,2 

Family

Robert John Leonard b. 18 Jul 1858

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S248] Free Note:, Unsourced one-sheet summary of information about Alice Adams and Robert John Leonard from Carol Stuart; Thornhill, Ontario, Canada; April 2004.

Amanda Adams1

F, b. circa 1832, d. 1850
FatherHorace Adams1 b. 1801, d. 1863
MotherSally R. (?)1 b. 1802, d. 1849
Married Name Ellis1 
Marriage* Principal=Sam Ellis1 
Birth*c 1832 1 
Death*1850 1 

Family

Sam Ellis

Citations

  1. [S411] James Ellis., LaGrange Pioneers (Reprinted August 1995 by the Walworth County Genealogical Society (originally published by the LaGrange Ladies Aid Society, 1935)),.

Angeline Adams1

F, b. 3 March 1810, d. 13 September 1895
Angeline Adams
1810-1895
FatherAaron Adams1 b. 22 Feb 1775, d. 22 Aug 1821
MotherElisabeth Bonesteel1 b. 17 Jan 1782, d. 29 Jul 1821
Biography* JAHR: Poor old lady, she was 86 years old when she fell down and broke a hip, and after being helpless for over a year, went to sleep on Tuesday and never woke up but lived until Friday, when her pure spirit passed away. She had been a member of the Methodist church since she was a young girl and was always a sincere Christian, and put her trust in God, always saying when in great trouble and helpless, "God will take care of me,"1 
Birth*3 Mar 1810 Livingston Manor, Shandaken, Ulster Co., New York, USA; Her obituary lists place of birth at Shandaker, Ulster Co., NY.1,2,3 
Residence1860 Candor, Tioga Co., Connecticut; Age 50, born in NY. Residing with her sister, Laura Willsey, and Laura's extended family.4 
Residence1870 Hudson/Lyons, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Recorded twice in the 1870 census: Enumerated with the household of her neice - Lord and Joannah Adams Rowe (age 60); Recorded 2nd in household of her sister, Joannah Adams Frank, age 59.5 
Residence*c 1876 Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; 1895 obituary says Angeline has lived with her sister Joannah for 19 years. 
Residence1880 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; census: boarder in Johanna Frank's household.6 
Residence1895 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota; Age 85, born in New York.7 
Death*13 Sep 1895 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; Redwood Gazette Obituary:

Miss Angeline Adams, an aged aunt of Mrs. L.N. Rowe, died at the home of her niece on Broadway, tis city, early last Friday morning. The deceased fell into a deep sleep on Tueday evening last, and the sleep was continuous up to the time she brethed her last. She was 85 years of age at the time of her death and has been an invalid a long time.

The funeral occurred from the residence last Sunday afternoon, Rev. L. L. Hanscom of the Methodist church and Rev. John Sinclair of the Presbyterian chuch, officiating. A large number of friends and acquaintances of the deceased followed the remains to their resting place in Redwood cemetery.

The deceased was born in Shandaker, Ulster county, New York, 85 years ago. she has made her home with Mrs. Rowe for the past nineteen years. She was a devout Christian and a member of the Methodist church.8,3 
Burial*1895 Lot A 90 13, Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA9 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S196] Shawn Corder Dixie Hansen. 10 January 2001, Redwood County Genealogical Society, 217 W Flynn St, Redwood Falls, MN 56283. 1411 Osceola Ave, Saint Paul, Ramsey Co., Minnesota, USA From cemetery stone.
  3. [S197] Redwood Gazette, Redwood Falls, MN 19 September 1895.
  4. [S336] 1860 US Census, Candor, Tioga Co., New York; page 14.
  5. [S77] 1870 US Census, WI,.
  6. [S15] 1880 US Census, WI,.
  7. [S183] 1895 Minnesota State Census, Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, page 5.
  8. [S196] Shawn Corder Dixie Hansen. 10 January 2001, Redwood County Genealogical Society, 217 W Flynn St, Redwood Falls, MN 56283. 1411 Osceola Ave, Saint Paul, Ramsey Co., Minnesota, USA From cemetery records.
  9. [S196] Shawn Corder Dixie Hansen. 10 January 2001, Redwood County Genealogical Society, 217 W Flynn St, Redwood Falls, MN 56283. 1411 Osceola Ave, Saint Paul, Ramsey Co., Minnesota, USA.

Ann Maria Adams1

F, b. circa 1806
FatherAaron Adams1 b. 22 Feb 1775, d. 22 Aug 1821
MotherElisabeth Bonesteel1 b. 17 Jan 1782, d. 29 Jul 1821
Married Name Morgan1 
Marriage* Principal=Jedadiah Morgan1 
Birth*c 1806 Ulster Co., New York, USA2,1 
Residence1870 Hudson (Lyons), Walworth Co., Wisconsin; Enumerated (Ann M. Morgan) in household with sister, Joanna Frank and also her sister, Angeline Adams.

She is age 64, without occupation.3 
Residence*1880 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; census: boarder in Johanna Frank's household.2 

Family

Jedadiah Morgan

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S15] 1880 US Census, WI,.
  3. [S337] 1870 US Census, Hudson (Lyons), Walworth Co., Wisconsin; Page 32.

Anna Adams1

F
FatherAbraham Adams1 d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams1 d. 1789
Married Name Jacocks1 
Marriage* Principal=Samuel Jacocks1 

Family

Samuel Jacocks

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.

Arthur H. Adams1

M, b. circa 1865
FatherOscar Henry Adams1 b. 1833, d. c 1877
MotherLucy (?)1 b. Sep 1840
Birth*c 1865 New York, USA2 
Residence*1880 Elmira, Chemung Co., New York, USA; Printer2 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, Elmira, Chemung Co., NY; page 303B.

Asahel Adams1

M
FatherAbraham Adams1 d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams1 d. 1789
Marriage* Principal=Deserta Cram1 

Family

Deserta Cram

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.

Benjamin Adams1

M
FatherAbraham Adams1 d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams1 d. 1789
Marriage* Principal=Chloe Hatch1 
Marriage* Principal=Sarah Gridley1 

Family 1

Sarah Gridley

Family 2

Chloe Hatch

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.

Betsey Ann Adams1

F, b. circa 1815
FatherAaron Adams1 b. 22 Feb 1775, d. 22 Aug 1821
MotherElisabeth Bonesteel1 b. 17 Jan 1782, d. 29 Jul 1821
Name Variation Elizabeth A.2 
Married Name Watterson1 
Birth*c 1815 Livingston Manor, Ulster Co., New York, USA1,2 
Residence*23 Oct 1835 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York; On 24 October 1835, Betsey Ann Adams appeared at a Livingston Co. Court and swore that she had witnessed a deed (grantor Jacob Frank) and said that she resides in the town of Mt. Morris in the County of Livingston.3 
Marriage*a 1835 Principal=Daniel Waterson1 
Residence1850 Galen, Wayne Co., New York; Age 35, born in New York.

Enumerated as Betsey Waterson.4 
Residence1860 Galen, Wayne Co., New York; Age 46, housekeeper. Enumerated as "Elizabeth A."2 

Family

Daniel Waterson b. c 1806
Marriage*a 1835 Principal=Daniel Waterson1 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S336] 1860 US Census, Galen, Wayne Co., New York; Page 129.
  3. [S421] , Volume 15, page 135.
  4. [S338] 1850 US Census, Galen, Wayne Co., New York.

Caroline Antoinette Adams1

F, b. 20 June 1820, d. 25 March 1825
FatherAaron Adams1 b. 22 Feb 1775, d. 22 Aug 1821
MotherElisabeth Bonesteel1 b. 17 Jan 1782, d. 29 Jul 1821
Note* Did she marry Jedadiah Morgan? Two Joannahs memoir says that her sister Ann Maria married her "brother-in-law" Jedadiah Morgan. If so, then her children are William and Mary Alphensene Morgan and they were raised by Ann Maria. 
Birthc 1816 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA1 
Birth*20 Jun 1820 2 
Death*25 Mar 1825 This death date for Caroline Antinett Adams appears in the typed transcript of the Philip Bonesteel Bible. However, the Two Joannah Memoirs make mention more than once of a Caroline as an adult. Although further research is needed, the death date appears to be in error in the typescript. The listed birthdate, however, is entirely logical (20 June 1820) as Joannah Adams Frank said that Caroline was just an infant when her parents died and they appear to have died in the summer of 1822.2 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S203] Bible owned by Philip Bonesteel (first owner) and Sarah Bonesteel of Victor NY (last owner), Hand-type transcript only. I have not seen the original bible or a facsimilie.. (Published in NY, 1809 by William Elliott and Robert Eastburn);.

Charles H. Adams1

M, b. circa 1861
FatherHorace Buddington Adams1 b. c 1835, d. a 1905
MotherMary Elizabeth Webster1 b. c 1842, d. 16 Jan 1921
Birth*c 1861 New York, USA2,1 
Residence*1880 Owego, Tioga Co., New York, USA; Tinsmith3,1 

Citations

  1. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, ED 215, Page 242C.
  2. [S56] "Burial index for Hickory Grove Cemetery, Walworth Co., WI," Wisconsin State Genealogical Society Vo 46, #1 (June 1999):.
  3. [S69] Natalie Gagnon to Dixie Hansen. 4 October 1999, 38 Prescott St.

Charlotte E. Adams1

F, b. 15 August 1853
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams1 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherRebecca Bowls1 b. c 1816
Residence* Omro, Wisconsin, USA1 
Birth*15 Aug 1853 Utica, Winnebago Co., Wisconsin, USA2 
Residence1860 Utica, Winnebago Co., Wisconsin, USA3 
Note*bt 20 Jan 1865 - 14 Aug 1869 Frank D. and Charlotte Adams received Pension of $8.00 per month as minor children of Aaron B. Adams. Amount increased to $10.00 month when they attain the age of 16. Pension to commence 20 January 1865 and to end on 14 Aug 1869.; Principal=Frank Darwin Adams4 
Residence1870 Rushford, Winnebago Co., Wisconsin; Age 17, at home, born in Wisconsin5 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S334] Aaron B. Adams; Certificate # 106549; US Civil War Pensions; Pension files contain a sworn statement by Adeline Fisk (dated 13 April 1866) that he was present at the birth of Charlotte E. daughter of Aaron B. Adams and Rebecca C. Adams on January 16 August 1853 at Utica in Winnebago County,Wisconsin. She indicated that a midwife was also present (Mrs. Ripley) who had since died. Rebecca (Adams) Redd separately testifies on 13 April 1867 that the actual date of birth for Charlotte was 15 August 1853 and that any other date reported is in error.
  3. [S18] 1860 US Census, WI, Winnebago Co., Page 58, Family of A.B. Adams on lines 30-37.
  4. [S334] Aaron B. Adams; Certificate # 106549; US Civil War Pensions;.
  5. [S337] 1870 US Census, Rushford, Winnebago Co., Wisconsin; page 24.

Clarinda A. Adams1,2

M, b. circa 1866
FatherWalter Frank Adams2 b. 1839, d. 1903
MotherSusan E. (?)2 b. c 1840
Employment* Texas, USA; JEAHR: Railroad brakeman1 
Death* Texas, USA; JEAHR: smallpox1 
Name Variation Clarence 
Birth*c 1866 Wisconsin, USA2 
Residence*1880 Toledo, Lucas Co., New York, USA2 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, ED 46, Page 441C.

Daniel Adams1

M, b. 17 May 1679
FatherSamuel Adams2 d. 1694
MotherMary Meeker
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Frank Valentine Hubbard
Marriage* probably daughter of John Cable; Principal=Rebecca (?)2 
Marriage* Principal=Sarah Turney2 
Birth*17 May 1679 1 
Land Tx*1733 He conveyed to son-in-law and dau. William Stevens and Rebecca his wife of Fairfield, land bounded on heirs of my bro. David Adams.2 

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Rebecca (?)
Children

Family 3

Sarah Turney b. s 1681
Child

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.
  2. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.
  3. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 7.

Daniel Adams1

M, b. 29 June 1707
FatherDaniel Adams1 b. 17 May 1679
MotherRebecca (?)1
Marriage* Principal=Joanna Lane1 
Baptism*29 Jun 1707 1 

Family

Joanna Lane b. s 1714, d. b 1755

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 7.

David Adams1

M, b. 24 June 1689, d. 1723
FatherSamuel Adams1 d. 1694
MotherMary Meeker1
Marriage* Principal=Abigail Silliman2 
Birth*24 Jun 1689 3 
Death*1723 3 
Will*5 Feb 1722/23 Will: wife Abigail; two children David, Anna; if both children die under age, a comfortable livelihood for my wife and balance to my brethren and sisters.2 
Probate*22 Apr 1723 2 

Family

Abigail Silliman

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.
  2. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 7.
  3. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6-7.

Edna M. Adams1

F, b. circa 1876
FatherHorace Buddington Adams1 b. c 1835, d. a 1905
MotherMary Elizabeth Webster1 b. c 1842, d. 16 Jan 1921
Birth*c 1876 New York, USA1 
Residence*1880 Owego, Tioga Co., New York, USA1 

Citations

  1. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, ED 215, Page 242C.

Edward Adams1

M, d. 1671
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Frank Valentine Hubbard
Marriage* Principal=Mary (?)1 
Death*1671 1 

Family

Mary (?)
Children

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.

Edwin M. Adams1

M, b. circa 1876
FatherHorace Buddington Adams1 b. c 1835, d. a 1905
MotherMary Elizabeth Webster1 b. c 1842, d. 16 Jan 1921
Birth*c 1876 New York, USA1 
Residence*1880 Owego, Tioga Co., New York, USA1 

Citations

  1. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, ED 215, Page 242C.

Eleanor Adams1

F, b. 30 August 1765
FatherJoseph Adams1 b. c 1740, d. 18 May 1826
MotherJoanna Disbrow b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829
Biography* JAF: It took a journey of four days to reach my Uncle Gregories house in the village of Norwalk on Long Island Sound. It was with eyes full of tears when I saw my father go away and leave us. My uncle and aunt were Methodists of the old stamp, and the meeting on the Sabbath were held in a large chamber in their house. Before the preaching there was always a class meeting and the old members enjoyed them so much. One old minister in particular would get in such an exalted frame of mind, that he became so limber that he bounded over the table.

Those old styled Methodists were good people and lived their daily lives according to the letters of the word. My aunt lived in a long two storied house which had large rooms, and it was built first as a tavern, but my Uncle Josiah Gregory had lived there many years. The parlor was used only on rare occasions, but it was a grand room in my eyes. There was an old style turkey carpet on the floor, and in one corner was a high cupboard in which the best china dishes were kept. The color of those company dishes were in colors of pink and white flowers. Everything was in perfect order, and on one side was a fireplace with brass andirons, but a fire was only built in honor of company when they came. In the long dining room there was always a cheerful fire in a large fire place during the cold weather. The great kitchen had a huge fire place, the kitchen fire was kept burning all winter by old Dark, a black woman owned by Aunt Ellen. We children used to love to sit by the warm fire in the' winter evenings, and hear Aunt Ellen tell stories about the war.

Well to go back to my story, I would say that some of the most pleasant days of my girlhood were?spent at the?home of my Uncle Josiah Gregory, and Aunt Ellen in Norwalk, Connecticut. I well remember of going to Long Island Sound many times, and the tide was out, we children would play on the sandy beach and gather shells and pretty stones. Sometimes we would wade out to a great rock called Seymours rock, where a man by that name was washed off when the tide was high and was drowned. It seems there were two lovers whose parents opposed their marriage and the agreed to sit on the rock and let the tide wash them off and they died together, and the people found them locked in each others arms. My uncle owned an oyster?bed, and they had all they wanted to eat. They used to make soup and also fry them in pork grease, which Aaron and I thought them very nice. I used to love to watch the white sails of the vessels in the distance on the Sound. 
Name Variation Ellen 
Married Name Gregory1 
Birth*30 Aug 1765 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA2,3,4 
Baptism10 Nov 1765 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA5,3,4 
Marriage*23 Jan 1783 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; Principal=Josiah Gregory1,3,6 
Residence*c 1813 Norwalk, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA1 
Residence1848 Westport, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA3,4 

Family

Josiah Gregory
Marriage*23 Jan 1783 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; Principal=Josiah Gregory1,3,6 
Child

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S204] Town Records of Redding, Fairfield Co., CT,.
  3. [S210] Michael S. Disbrow., Descendants of Thomas and Mercy (Holbridge) Disbrow (Disbrow Family Association, 1992),.
  4. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 12.
  5. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.
  6. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 12 (from pension records).

Elizabeth Adams1

F
FatherAbraham Adams1 d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams1 d. 1789
Married Name Fillio1 
Marriage* Principal=Nathan Fillio1 

Family

Nathan Fillio

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.

Elizabeth Adams1

F, b. 2 June 1717
FatherDaniel Adams1 b. 17 May 1679
MotherSarah Turney1 b. s 1681
Baptism*2 Jun 1717 1 
Married Name18 Apr 1735 Mallory1 
Marriage*18 Apr 1735 Principal=John Mallory1 

Family

John Mallory

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 7.

Frank Adams1

M, b. circa 1853
FatherWilliam Henry Harrison Adams1 b. c 1814
MotherLuzette (?)1 b. c 1822
Birth*c 1853 New York1 
Residence*1870 Spencer, Tioga Co., New York1 

Citations

  1. [S337] 1870 US Census, Spencer, Tioga Co., New York; page 9.

Frank Darwin Adams1

M, b. 19 January 1851
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams1 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherRebecca Bowls1 b. c 1816
Residence* Omro, Wisconsin, USA1 
Birth*19 Jan 1851 Utica, Winnebago Co., Wisconsin, USA2 
Residence1860 Utica, Winnebago Co., New York, USA3 
Note*bt 20 Jan 1865 - 14 Aug 1869 Frank D. and Charlotte Adams received Pension of $8.00 per month as minor children of Aaron B. Adams. Amount increased to $10.00 month when they attain the age of 16. Pension to commence 20 January 1865 and to end on 14 Aug 1869.; Principal=Charlotte E. Adams4 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S334] Aaron B. Adams; Certificate # 106549; US Civil War Pensions; Pension files contain a sworn statement by J.H. Wright, M.D. (dated 9 May 1867) that he was present at the birth of Frank Darwin son of Aaron B. Adams and Rebecca C. Adams on January 19th AD 1851 at Utica in Winnebago County,Wisconsin.
  3. [S18] 1860 US Census, WI, Winnebago Co., Page 58, Family of A.B. Adams on lines 30-37.
  4. [S334] Aaron B. Adams; Certificate # 106549; US Civil War Pensions;.

Gaylord Willsey Adams1

M, b. circa 1830
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams2 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherMary Ann Budington1 b. 16 May 1809, d. c 1844
Employment* Harness Maker 
Biography* JEAHR: When I was about eleven years old, my mother died suddenly. A few weeks after her death my oldest brother Gaylord Willsey Adams came alone to our place. He had never been to school but a short time and his aunts made him clothes and sent him to the district school in our neighborhood with myself and Oscar. After a year or so my Uncle Gaylord Willsey got him a place to learn the trade of a harness maker, and when he was old enough to set up a shop for himself and done a good business as he was quite an expert making fine harness, and there were no sewing machines then.

Gaylord W. Adams was successful in his trade as harness maker, married but had not children Just in the prime of life he had a stroke of paralysis and lay helpless for about three years and then passed away at Candon, Tioga Co., New York.1,2 
Name Variation Gale3 
Marriage* Principal=Amanda (?)3 
Birth*c 1830 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA; Age 22 at 1850 census2,4,5 
Residence*1850 Livonia, Livingston Co., New York, USA; Saddler; enumerated in household of William Thurston, a blacksmith.4 
Residence1860 Mount Morris, Livingston Co., New York; "Gale Adams", Harness Maker, Age 30, Personal Estate $500. Several others listed after Gale and Amanda in HH: Maria Eastman (23); Ruth Eastman (70); Louisa Aplin (13), Mary Bingham (74), and L.C. Bingham (42). The latter is a Harward Merchant and has real estate valued at $10,000 and a personal estate at $6,000.3 
Death* Candon, Tioga Co., New York, USA; Had a "stroke of paralysis" in the prime of his life and was helpless for 3 years before dying.2 
Burial*c 1889 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York; Index card reads:

Gaylord W. Adams
b. 1830
d. 1889

Mt. Morris (cemetery)/ Mt. Morris 

Family

Amanda (?) b. c 1832
Marriage* Principal=Amanda (?)3 

Citations

  1. [S180] Author Unknown, Brief "Adams" Genealogy (unpublished notes in possession of Dixie Hansen), Date Unknown,.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S336] 1860 US Census, Mount Morris, Livingston Co., NY; p 72 (34).
  4. [S338] 1850 US Census, Livonia, Livingston Co., NY; Page 167.
  5. [S441] Livingston Co., NY Burial Index Cards - A card file index from a cemetery reading of legible cemetery markers in Livinston Co., prior to 1885, b. 1830 / d. 1889 Mt. Morris (cemetery) / Mt. Morris.

George L. Adams1

M, b. 11 September 1884, d. 17 April 1970
FatherHorace Buddington Adams1 b. c 1835, d. a 1905
MotherMary Elizabeth Webster1 b. c 1842, d. 16 Jan 1921
Burial* Evergreen Cemetery, Tioga, Tioga Co., New York1 
Birth*11 Sep 1884 1 
Death*17 Apr 1970 1 

Citations

  1. [S545] Pete Adams to Dixie Hansen. 19 August 2007, e-mail address.

Harry Adams1

M
FatherJoseph Adams1 b. c 1740, d. 18 May 1826
MotherJoanna Disbrow1 b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.

Hezekiah Adams1

M, b. 14 August 1764, d. 25 December 1819
FatherJoseph Adams1 b. c 1740, d. 18 May 1826
MotherJoanna Disbrow1 b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829
Milit-Beg* Rev Soliders of Redding CT: This man was among the youngest of those who offered their services in defense of their country. He was too young to go into the ranks as a soldier, but joined the army as a teamster, "and on one occasion drove a wagon loaded with Spanish milled dollars to Baltimore." - [Todd's History of Redding.]2 
Birth*14 Aug 1764 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA2,3,4,5 
Baptism30 Sep 1764 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA1,4,5 
Marriage*11 Sep 1788 Principal=Betty Parsons2,4,5 
Burial* Lonetown Cemetery, Fairfield, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA2 
Death*25 Dec 1819 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA2,4,5 
Probate6 Mar 1820 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; Administration granted to Lemuel Adams of Redding. Distribution: widow Betty; children, Betsey, Stephen, Lemuel, Aaron, Eleanor, Jedediah.5 

Family

Betty Parsons b. 17 Mar 1771, d. 23 May 1849
Marriage*11 Sep 1788 Principal=Betty Parsons2,4,5 

Citations

  1. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.
  2. [S195] William Edgar Grumman, The Revolutionary Soldiers of Redding Connecticut and the Record of Their Services (Hartford Press, 1904),.
  3. [S204] Town Records of Redding, Fairfield Co., CT,.
  4. [S210] Michael S. Disbrow., Descendants of Thomas and Mercy (Holbridge) Disbrow (Disbrow Family Association, 1992),.
  5. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 12.

Horace Adams1

M, b. 1801, d. 1863
FatherNathanial Adams1 b. 27 Jan 1778
MotherLucinda (?)1 b. c 1781
Burial* Round Prairie, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA1 
Marriage* Principal=Sally R. (?)2 
Birth*1801 New York3,4 
Residencebt 1845 - 1863 Heart Prairie, LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin; Came from New York with his family in 1845 and bought 160 acres in S 1/2 N 1/2 of Sec 30, Heart Prairie. Here he lived 18 years.2 
Marriage*a 1849 Principal=Fanny Compton3 
Residence*1850 LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA4 
Residence1860 LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Farmer, Real Estate valued at $2,000; Personal Estate at $2,6253 
Death*1863 2 

Family 1

Sally R. (?) b. 1802, d. 1849
Marriage* Principal=Sally R. (?)2 
Child

Family 2

Fanny Compton b. c 1808
Marriage*a 1849 Principal=Fanny Compton3 
Child

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S411] James Ellis., LaGrange Pioneers (Reprinted August 1995 by the Walworth County Genealogical Society (originally published by the LaGrange Ladies Aid Society, 1935)),.
  3. [S18] 1860 US Census, WI,.
  4. [S22] 1850 US Census, Wisconsin,.

Horace Buddington Adams1

M, b. circa 1835, d. after 1905
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams2 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherMary Ann Budington1 b. 16 May 1809, d. c 1844
Employment* Oswego, Oswego Co., New York, USA; Had a hardware store.2 
Milit-Beg* Civil War: Bugler in a band belonging to a NY Regiment2 
Graduation* Urbanna University2 
Biography* JEAHR: The same year my brother Gaylord came from Michigan, our brother Horace only a small boy only about ten years old, came from Michigan to find his brothers and he was a stranger to us all. Uncle Gaylord Willsey and Aunt Laura took him to bring up with Oscar.

Horace Buddington Adams was two years younger than Oscar Henry and was also brought up by Uncle Gaylord Willsey and Aunt Laura.

He was a graduate of the Urbanna University in Ohio. His aunt sent him there because the school was inclined to the religion she was a firm member in that is the New Church as it was called and they were believers and followers of the faith taught by Emanuel Sweden burg, a faith so deep to understand for they read the Bible and understood the meaning by correspondences. After all his education he wanted to learn the trade of a tinner at which he worked for many years and when the Civil War broke out he went as bugler in a band belong to a New York regiment. Afterward he had a hardware store in Oswego, N.Y. where he has lived ever since and now while I am writing he has a home there, and his two grown up boys run the store. He was married after the war and has raised a large family now grown up and married of which I know nothing of for I have only seen him once in the course of 40 years.
2 
Birth*c 1835 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA; Age 44 on 1880 census; Birth date is very rough - by Joannah's reference to his age being 10 at the time that her other brother Gaylord came to NY and her earlier reference the fact that Gaylord came to NY during the year in which her mother died and the other reference to the fact that her mother died when Joannah was about 11 years old and our knowlege of the fact that Joannah was born late in 1831. But then Joannah also says that Horace was 2 years younger than Oscar Henry and that Oscar Henry was 16 when she last saw him in 1849 which would mean that he was born circa 1833 and Horace would have been born in 1835. (In other words - it's pretty convoluted calculating).2,3 
Marriage*14 Aug 1860 First Baptist Church, Owego, Tioga Co., New York; Principal=Mary Elizabeth Webster3,4 
Residence*1880 Owego, Tioga Co., New York, USA; Tin Smith3 
Death*a 1905 Oswego, New York, USA2 
Death1 Feb 1913 Owego, Tioga Co., New York4 
Burial*3 Feb 1913 Evergreen Cemetery, Owego, Tioga Co., New York4 

Family

Mary Elizabeth Webster b. c 1842, d. 16 Jan 1921
Marriage*14 Aug 1860 First Baptist Church, Owego, Tioga Co., New York; Principal=Mary Elizabeth Webster3,4 
Children

Citations

  1. [S180] Author Unknown, Brief "Adams" Genealogy (unpublished notes in possession of Dixie Hansen), Date Unknown,.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, ED 215, Page 242C.
  4. [S545] Pete Adams to Dixie Hansen. 19 August 2007, e-mail address.

Huldah Adams1

F, b. circa 1750, d. 18 November 1833
FatherAbraham Adams1 d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams1 d. 1789
Birth*c 1750 1 
Married Name5 Apr 1768 Ferris1 
Marriage*5 Apr 1768 Principal=Zachariah Ferris1 
Death*18 Nov 1833 Newton1 

Family

Zachariah Ferris

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.

Israel Adams1

M, b. 5 September 1772, d. 27 September 1838
FatherJoseph Adams1 b. c 1740, d. 18 May 1826
MotherJoanna Disbrow1 b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829
Birth*5 Sep 1772 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA2,3,4 
Baptism10 Jan 1773 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA1,3,4 
Marriage*28 Mar 1796 Principal=Abigail Stowe1,3,4 
Death*27 Sep 1838 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; age 661,3,4 

Family

Abigail Stowe b. 11 Apr 1776, d. 27 Oct 1824

Citations

  1. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.
  2. [S204] Town Records of Redding, Fairfield Co., CT,.
  3. [S210] Michael S. Disbrow., Descendants of Thomas and Mercy (Holbridge) Disbrow (Disbrow Family Association, 1992),.
  4. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 12.

James H. Adams1

M, b. circa 1845, d. 3 July 1862
FatherHorace Adams1 b. 1801, d. 1863
MotherFanny Compton1 b. c 1808
Birth*c 1845 Wisconsin, USA1 
Death*3 Jul 1862 A soldier in the Civil War, died in the South.2 

Citations

  1. [S18] 1860 US Census, WI,.
  2. [S411] James Ellis., LaGrange Pioneers (Reprinted August 1995 by the Walworth County Genealogical Society (originally published by the LaGrange Ladies Aid Society, 1935)),.

Joannah Adams1

F, b. 18 May 1804, d. 31 March 1900
FatherAaron Adams2 b. 22 Feb 1775, d. 22 Aug 1821
MotherElisabeth Bonesteel b. 17 Jan 1782, d. 29 Jul 1821
Biography* MEMORIES OF JOANNAH FRANK

In the year 1804, 1 looked for the first time upon the beauties of this lower world.

My father Aaron Adams who married my mother only a few years before, had one daughter Laura Ann, when I came to add one more to the household. My mother Elisabeth Bonesteel was a full blooded German, while my father was a Yankee whose forefathers came from England when the American Colonies were new.

My parents never told me that I was a prodigy, but of one thing I am certain, that I was blessed with a good appetite. Almost the first thing I can remember, is of going softly into my mother's room to see a baby brother, and of seeing my mother sleeping quietly on the bed. On the table was a bowl of which was then called panada) made of hot water and whiskey with toast put in that was often given to sick folks in those days before the temperance question had been agitated. It looked very good, and I tasted of it, and kept tasting until I eat it all up. People in those days always kept wine or some choice liquor, and small glasses to treat their friends who called at the house, And it would have been considered a great lack of hospitality not to have done so.

My sister Laura was two years older than I, she had large black eyes and her beautiful hair always laid in waves over her high forehead. She was always dignified and lady like even at an early age, and I always admired her and looked up to her as a model of propriety.

As for myself I was always a romp and into all sorts of escapades. I never knew just what color my eyes would have been called, but in the glass they looked to me to be almost green, but I suppose they would be called a light gray, and I too had a heavy lot of dark hair. My brother was named Aaron after my father who was a large fine looking man, with blue eyes and dark hair. He had a good education and had fine manners and I was always very proud of him. My brother was never the gentleman my father was for although as he grew up, he was a generous and whole souled fellow, he was a rough fun loving man. The home of my childhood was in Ulster County, State of New York. My father built a large house at the foot of Pine hill on a road called a turnpike, and in the background, were large hills covered with great pine and hemlock trees. A spring from the mountain side came trickling down on one side of the house from which we had pure water to use. Old Shenandoah creek also ran by, and many happy days in my childhood I spent fishing for the speckled trout that lived in the clear waters. The country was new and the most of the dwellings were built of logs, so my fathers large house seemed like a mansion in my childish imagination. It was a white two story building with a wide veranda in front, and as my father was a regular Yankee for invention, he put his house in good use in many ways. In the front were two large rooms, of which one was kept as a general store, and the other a bar room, for he kept the only public house for miles around. Many travellers partook of the good cheer in this old fashioned house where in cold weather they sat around the blazing logs in a great fire place, and neighbors would gather in the long evenings, and many a story would be told by the early settlers of hardships and adventures with the red men of the forest. Back of these were the living rooms of the family, and in the rear was a great kitchen and out buildings also sleeping rooms for the black folks, who did all the work. In?those days before slavery was abolished in the State of New York, every family of any importance kept slaves, who performed all the labor indoors and out. Over the store was a ballroom, and it was also used for a Free Masons lodge, and my father was some way up Officer. I think he was the Grand Master and I thought the red silk sash and apron he wore was very beautiful. The apron had queer characters on it made of white and I have since learned it read "God". The country post office was in one corner of the store, and the mail was carried by a man on horse back. Near by he kept a blacksmith shop for his own use and also his neighbors. Besides being Justice of the Peace he held other offices in the town. He was also a good musician and he used to play on his fiddle and learn us children to dance. I loved to hear him sing and I remember one free Mason song and the last line of the chorus was "And the apron Adam wore was a symbol of Masonry". He had one slave "Old Tom" who used to take care of little Aaron and tote him around day after day. He was a Guina negro and many years before was brought over the sea. He was very honest and did not need watching. The man my father bought him of, had been in the habit of giving him the food he thought he needed to make him strong just as he would feed a horse, and if he did not eat it all up, he whipped him and made him down it all. As a general thing food was taken from our table and put on one in the kitchen for Tom and our folks used to wonder how in the world he made away with all the meat and bread taken in for him. One day there was a big pan of soup taken in for him, and my father happened to go through the room while he was eating. He saw Tom slowly eating, and the perspiration was running down his black face. Tom looked up into my fathers face and said in a mournful tone of voice, "Oh Massa, I got sat and I'se can't eat it all." "Why Tom," said my father, "You need not eat any more than you want." The poor fellow looked up with tears in his eyes and said "Tank you Massa, tank you."

It seems in fear of punishment, he had been in the habit when he could not eat all set before him, to take what was left and bury it in some remote corner of a fence. He was a good kind black man, and I believe now he occupies a higher seat in Glory than many white men who felt above him here.

When my father first set up a home of his own, he bought a young Negro, who had just enough white blood to make him sly and cunning and he would steal anything, whenever he got a chance: He was very good looking and a handy fellow at all sorts of work. His name was Prince and he was a master hand in the care of horses always drove them whenever my father went away from home. He was however a great trial and cost my father a great amount of money to settle up for the sly capers upon other people. He married a free colored girl named Sarah, and they lived at our place where they had a room and cooked and eat by themselves in the big kitchen) and their sleeping room was over it. As I can remember them, there were a lot of little black children in the family, and she took as much care of us as our mother did, and when she would go away with our father, she would leave us in?the care of Sarah who took great pains to keep us clean and well fed. She was very good and kind and made her children treat us with the greatest respect. The days we spent under her dare have always been remembered as some of the happiest of my life.

I must have been about six years old when I was sent to school which was about two miles from our place. I must have been a quaint little maid, with a pressed flannel dress which came down to the top of my shoes, and I wore a square of plaid flannel for my wrap. The school house was built of logs and on one side of the large room was a fire place of huge dimensions, where the fire of blazing logs sent a warm glow all over the room when the weather was cold. The schoolmaster was an old man by the name of Dyer, and he ruled the school with the rod, and every day a bunch of birch sprouts helped to keep good order in the school room. I was always glad when night came and I trudged along on my way home. Often in the cold weather there was an old couple who would be going along home and would ask me to ride. There was only one seat in the sleigh and this good old Quaker lady always carried a foot stove (as they were called those times.) A little affair with coals put in on which to keep the feet warm. She would say "Thee can sit on Phoebe Stinsons stove". In those days this little stove was very handy to take to the meeting house on Sunday as they used to have no way of warming the room, as only fire places were used in the dwelling houses, to keep warm by or cook everything.

My mother was a very lady like dignified woman with black eyes and hair and I was very proud of her but I was very fond of my?father, for he was a cheerful jovial man with a kind word for everyone. As I remember him, he was a portly man with brown curling hair and bright blue eyes. Although I was quite a young woman when they died I can see them now just as they looked. My mother was very particular how she looked and I remember how she used to have her black glossy hair curled in front every morning and put back with side, combs. She always wore a white lace jocky cap with a full crown, and trimmed with some bright colored ribbon. Her maiden name was Elisabeth Bonesteel, and my father got acquainted with her at her fathers house which was about two miles from the Hudson river. Her father was a German and very patriotic?to his adopted country. He, was a Captain in the Revolutionary War, and was wounded in one hip, which made him some crooked, so he had always to walk with a cane. He was a very good man and some of the pleasantest days of my girlhood was spent at his home which was about a mile from a small village. It was a long old fashioned house, painted red and had double doors. The large room in front was always a beautiful place to me and it was called the blue room., and the wood work was painted a bright blue. The floor was covered with a striped yarn carpet of shades of blue. In one corner stood a bedstead with high posts at each corner, with blue curtains all around. There was a blue home made coverlid on the great feather bed, which looked as though it needed a ladder to climb into it. My grandmothers table was always set with the finest dishes of pink and white china, and when I went to see them they always had rye bread and butter and honey which I thought was a feast, fit for a king. The kitchen floor was always kept as clean and white, with sand sprinkled over every day which was brought from the creek which ran by the house. I used to go down to a spring with my grandfather down some rocky steps where he would bring water for the use of the household, and it was a cold as ice. Across the creek lived my Uncle Henry who had a most worthy family, and they were called well to do in this worlds goods. His land was what was called leased land. and he had a three years life lease, while my grandfathers lease read "As long as the sun shone and water run." All the land in that section was called "The Livingston Manor". It seems strange that people would spend their lives on rented land to improve them and set out orchards and build good houses, and pay tithes to a wealthy land holder. At that time the great west was almost unknown and they never even dreamed of a time coming when people could go and take up land and paying a few dollars have it all their own. Those visits to my grandfathers were very delightful occasions to me and when I was seated in the old family carriage with Prince driving, it was a happy time. My grandfather set great store of his bees and he believed if they were not told of every thing that occurred worthy of mention, that they would fly away, never to return. So he would go to each hive of which they were very numerous and tapping on each hive tell them over what had happened. When my grandmother died he went out and tapping on each hive told them "Vroncher is dead, Vroncher is dead".

At the head of Cayouga Lake lived my Uncle Joseph Adams (my fathers brother) at a place called Stanford and my sister Laura was sent there to go to school, which was far ahead of our country school. I was sent to my grandfathers to go to school at Woodstock, but I got homesick after a few weeks and nothing would console me. All the comforts of this well ordered home, and even a good supply of bread and butter and honey, would not make up for the pleasures of my own home. I wanted to see the black folks even and there was Sarah and her pickininnies who always amused me, playing around the brook. The negroes used to have such a lot of fun in the great kitchen in the winter evenings. There was always a big blazing fire in the great fire place burning. We used to love to go in and?see the fun and Prince was always playing his jokes on the others. Poor old Tom was very fond of baked potatoes, and he would put some in the hot ashes and then lie down on the floor, with his feet to the fire and then go to sleep. Prince would watch and as soon as their potatoes were done, and take them out and eat them, and put some new raw ones in their place. After a while Tom would wake up and go see to his potatoes and find they were not done so he would put some more hot ashes over them and lay down again, and soon would be fast asleep. Sometimes mischievous Prince would put raw potatoes a number of times, but good honest Tom would wait patiently for his feast of baked potatoes.

When I had been at school nearly a year, staying with my grandparents, my father and mother came to see me, and I saw for the first time my baby sister called Betsey Ann. She was a little chubby thing with black eyes and hair. I was so homesick that I cried the most of the time while they were there. I told my father it was a wart on my finger that hurt so that it made m e cry. My father decided to take me home. As soon as we were on our way, I found out that there was, no more pain in that wart. The rural life at home made me very happy, and I could climb the rocky hill side and fish for trout in the clear water of Shenlaken creek. In the evening you could hear the panthers scream in the forest, but it was music to my ears. In a few more years, there were two more girls added to the family group called Ann Maria and Angeline and although I bore the dignified name of Joannah, I was?never so nicely behaved as my sisters were as I was a regular romp, and would rather play out of doors with my brother Aaron than be with the girls in the house. I think that Ann Maria and Angeline were both born to be old maids as they were always just as prim and precise as could be and my sister Laura was always lady like from a child. In any sort of pleasant weather I was always out of doors and I used to wonder how my sisters could be so happy indoors playing with their dolls. As soon as they could hold a needle they would piece up little blocks of patch work. I don't believe from that day to this, they ever said a rough word I or acted any way but nice and proper. About that time the war of 1812 broke out and there was a draft made by the government and many of our neighbors elected to go. Their wives and mothers used to come to our house and urge my father to go with them, but he could not be taken with them in the army as he had a broken arm once which made it crooked, and of course unfit for service. It always bothered him and made him unfit for doing any sort of work. When they were all ready to go, they met at our house with the Officers who came to go with them, and all of the women and children came to bid them good bye. They had to go by team 35 miles to get to the river, where they were to take a boat for the city of New York. The women cried, and said "Oh Judge Adams if you would only go with them, we would go home satisfied." That night after they were gone and my Father was in bed and asleep, he suddenly woke up and it all at once occurred to him that it was his duty to go with these good neighbors. He had a chance to in the capacity of a subtler to the regiment. He woke up my mother and said "Betsey I think I must go with the regiment to the seat of war". He waked up Prince, and had the horses put before the old carriage at once, and throwing a few things in a carpet bag, he started for Sopus, where he took a boat for New York City. The troops were in camp at Staten Island being drilled for war. He reached the regiment and at once got a position as subtler greatly to the joy of his friends. He had not been away only about six weeks when peace was declared and the men were discharged and sent home without even having been in a battle. When it was heard What day they would be expected home, all the women and children met at our house to meet them. There was a great rejoicing when they came and a mixture of laughter and tears for everyone was so glad the war was over. The day they were expected we were all outside to see the first sight of them. When we saw the soldiers coming up the rise of ground in front of the house, the children at our house ran as fast as they could shouting "Pappy, Pappy, oh Pappy has come" and the black folks too all outside to see Massa Adams, for he was beloved by both black and white. About that time he hired a dancing master to come to the house and instruct us in the difficult steps taken in those days in the dances. The neighborhood young folks would come in also and all learned how to "trip the light fantastic toe."

Those were happy days in the home, at the foot of Pine Hill and I never dreamed of the changes in our lives yet to come. Father often talked of going to some other locality where land could be bought cheap, and he always wanted a big farm. There was a great immigration in the southwestern part of New York State which was called the Genesee Country. It was said to be a good sort of land, on to which to raise winter?wheat. He had an idea of selling the old home and moving father west. He could not look into the future, but if he could have known what trouble would come to his family he would have remained in the old home by the rocky hillside, and the soft murmuring of old Shenlaken creek in Ulster County.

A year well remembered in my girlhood, was when I was sent to Connecticut to go to school. My fathers sister Ellen (who was married to Josiah Gregory) came out to make us a visit and my brother Aaron and myself went home with them. It was early in the spring before the ice broke up in the river, we had to cross. My father took us in a big sleigh (as it was in the winter) and before we got half way over the river, we could hear the ice beginning to crack. My father put the whip on the horses and every jump they gave the ice would break and the water pur up on top. We got over safe, but we heard afterward of people who lost their horses trying to cross the river.

The journey was a great novelty to me as I had never been so far away from home. We passed through the village Danbury which was burned by the British in the Revolutionary War. We children loved to hear the stories of what took place during that terrible war. The soldiers went through that part of the country and burned or destroyed every thing they could lay their hands on. My grandmother Adams took her silver and all of her valuables and put them in a bag and sunk them in the bottom of the well. It took a journey of four days to reach my Uncle Gregories house in the village of Norwalk on Long Island Sound. It was with eyes full of tears when I saw my father go away and leave us. My uncle and aunt were Methodists of the old stamp, and the meeting on the Sabbath were held in a large chamber in their house. Before the preaching there was always a class meeting and the old members enjoyed them so much. One old minister in particular would get in such an exalted frame of mind, that he became so limber that he bounded over the table.

Those old styled Methodists were good people and lived their daily lives according to the letters of the word. My aunt lived in a long two storied house which had large rooms, and it was built first as a tavern, but my Uncle Josiah Gregory had lived there many years. The parlor was used only on rare occasions, but it was a grand room in my eyes. There was an old style turkey carpet on the floor, and in one corner was a high cupboard in which the best china dishes were kept. The color of those company dishes were in colors of pink and white flowers. Everything was in perfect order, and on one side was a fireplace with brass andirons, but a fire was only built in honor of company when they came. In the long dining room there was always a cheerful fire in a large fire place during the cold weather. The great kitchen had a huge fire place, the kitchen fire was kept burning all winter by old Dark, a black woman owned by Aunt Ellen. We children used to love to sit by the warm fire in the' winter evenings, and hear Aunt Ellen tell stories about the war. I remember one incident, when the news came to my Grandma Adams (Aunt Ellens mother) that the British troops were marching through the country that she got up from a sick bed, and went down cellar. She had no sooner got into one corner of the cellar and got herself all wrapped up in a blanket, when she heard the soldiers firing at the house. When they had gone away, she came up from the cellar, and saw the head board of her bedstead was riddled full of holes. In the back yard of my Aunts house was a pear tree that made a pleasant shade when the warm spring days came. It was a favorite place for old Dark, who would take out a chair and sit there, and in the mornings she would comb my hair and get me ready for school. When summer came we had a delightful visit to my fathers native place at Redding, where my grandfather Adams lived. He lived a few miles from the* village on a farm and he was a pleasant easy going old gentleman. He had bright blue eyes and red hair. My Uncle Harry lived near by and they were all thrifty Yankee farmers. My grandfathers oldest son Henry was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and when the war was over he was discharged and started for home, but died on the way. All the soldiers had land given them by the government, after the war and the tract given to him, as near as the relatives could discover was right where the city of Washington now is situated. They talked it over often and let the affair drift along, but none of them had enough energy to go to law about it, and try to establish the claim., so it was never settled in any way. My Uncle Joseph was a very honest man, and he could not be tempted to tell a lie. One day he was driving a very fine horse along the road and he met a man, who stopped him and asked if that horse was for sale. My uncle said, "Yes sir." "'What price do put on him?" the man asked him, "is he honest and gentle?" said the stranger. "No he is not," said my uncle, "As he has many bad ways and mean tricks and he is balky also, I doubt if he would work for you at all" said my Uncle Joe. The man made up his mind that no man would run down his own horse, and was only talking to get around his offer of selling him. He had taken a great fancy to the horse and he was a mate to one he owned. He told my uncle he would give him 150 dollars for tile horse. My uncle told him, "You will be very much disappointed in the animal, and he will balk when you attempt to ride him." The man thought after he had used the horse a few days, that there was one honest man in the state, and of course he could do nothing about the bad bargain, as he had been told all about the horse, so he had to put up with it the best he could.

My grandfather used to love to tell stories of the doings of the Adams family, and he really thought they could not be beat at anything. He often told us about his cousin John Adams, who was one of the first presidents and also of his son John Adams who was also at one time president of the United States. They were a very musical family and I thought no one could play the fiddle any better than my father. His brother Nathan and his son Nathan were fine musicians and used to play for dances. Uncle Nathans children had all grown up when he immigrated with his son Nathan to Wisconsin, driving a team from Spencer in Tioga County New York State clear through to Wisconsin, and settled on Heart Prairie in Walworth Co., where he lived many years. I presume there are yet many living amongst the old settlers who have tripped "the light fantastic Toe" after the inspiring music of the Severance and Adams band. Uncle Nathan was also a good scholar in arithmetic and algebra and liked to have people come to him with sums and problems for him to make out. He had but one great fault (that was his love for ardent spirits), and he would not play for a dance until he had a drink or so. He had a large family of boys and girls and after they were grown up, the boys used to talk to him to try have him break off as they were really ashamed of him. His wife, Aunt Lucinda used to Put a stop to their talking to him about drinking and say "You'll never make half so decent a man as your father." Strange to say, none of the boys ever touched liquor of any kind, and were honest temperate men and respected by all. The old people lived to be very old, and after Aunt Lucinda died, Uncle Nathan went to New York to visit his daughter Mary. They were strong Baptists, and used to have their family prayers after he had gone to bed, thinking he would not enjoy hearing them. He said to Mary one day, "Why do you wait until I am in bed before you have your prayers?" Mary said "Why, Father, I thought you would not care to hear them." He said, "Well don't do that any more." Strange to say, although he was over 80 years old, he experienced religion and became a member of the Baptist church and stopped drinking and was a sober good Christian church member until his death which took place a few years later, on Heart Prairie, Wisconsin. When he passed away, his remains were laid by his wife Lucinda, and his son Horace and Nathan who died of cholera many years before. They lie in the old burying ground on Round Prairie Walworth Co., Wisconsin.

Well to go back to my story, I would say that some of the most pleasant days of my girlhood were?spent at the?home of my Uncle Josiah Gregory, and Aunt Ellen in Norwalk, Connecticut. I well remember of going to Long Island Sound many times, and the tide was out, we children would play on the sandy beach and gather shells and pretty stones. Sometimes we would wade out to a great rock called Seymours rock, where a man by that name was washed off when the tide was high and was drowned. It seems there were two lovers whose parents opposed their marriage and the agreed to sit on the rock and let the tide wash them off and they died together, and the people found them locked in each others arms. My uncle owned an oyster?bed, and they had all they wanted to eat. They used to make soup and also fry them in pork grease, which Aaron and I thought them very nice. I used to love to watch the white sails of the vessels in the distance on the Sound, My Uncle and Aunt never had but one child and her name was Lucinda and she married when quite young., and in a few years after she died, leaving one little girl, whose name was Elosia, and her grandparents took her and brought her up, and she was a young lady when I was there. The next year she was married and only lived a few years when she died and left a baby girl who was named Elosia. She was sent to my Aunt Ellen who brought her up. Elosia had been married a few years when Aunt Ellen died leaving, her a large property. Uncle Josiah used to drive his cows three miles to a pasture he owned on Chestnut Hill I and it was a great treat for me to ride a horse and help drive them. I never could bear to be cooped up in a house but wanted to be in the open air and they called me a tom boy. I don't think I could have learned much at school, and it could not be seen that my brother Aaron had learned anything. I shed a great many tears over him as I used to have a terrible time to coax him to go to school with me. He could not bear the restraint of a school room, so he never became much of a scholar, but was always noted for his quick wit, and ready answer to any question asked him. He was always good natured, and very generous and kind hearted and full of fun. After he grew up he spent much of his time in different sorts of amusement and sports. Running horses was one of his favorite pastimes. He was never lucky in his bets on a race but more often was a loser, so he never had much money. Poor Aaron, the ups and downs of his life would fill a book if written. It was closed the time of the great rebellion in the 60's where he was a soldier and died in a hospital and his remains lie in a cemetery at Evansville Indiana. I think peoples minds are apt to wander back on the events of a long life, and remember what happened when they were young as I never forgot the year spent in old Connecticut.

I remember how glad I was when my father came to take us home, and how pleasant the house seemed at the foot of Pine Hill. And to see my mother and sisters again, and the pleasant faces the black folks looked good to me. Poor old Tom really cried for joy to see the little Master Aaron again. One incident impressed upon my mind, in the year after I came back, (that is) the work of my mother in getting my father ready to go to Albany in the fall as he was elected togo to the Legislature. The summer before a first class woman for the work was brought to the house to spin the fine yarn to make the cloth fit to be made into clothes. When the yarn was ready it was taken to the weavers. From there it went to the Dyers to be colored a dark brown, and then to the Fullers to be pressed and fulled. Then a journey had to be made to town to get the cloth for shirts, and to get. shoes and knee buckles, also trimming and linings for the, clothes. A woman tailoress was brought to the house, who used to sit day after day, and stitch for several weeks and as fast as she sewed a seam, she put a press board across her lap, and taken the iron goose from before the fire and press the seam flat. A sewing machine was never dreamed of in those days. At last the clothes were finished, and it was time to go, and as there were no railroads in those days, my father had Prince drive the horses before the carriage and take him and his carpet bag to Albany. We children were very proud of father and we looked with admiration on him, dressed so fine. I well remember the trousers which came only to his knees, and how the silver buckles shone and his shoes also with bright buckles on top. He had a long vest and a white ruffled shirt, also ruffles at the wrist and his long curling hair was braided and tied with a black ribbon. The overcoat was called then a great coat, and was made of the same clothes his clothes, and lined with flannel and wadded warmly as the climate was cold in the winter. DeWitt Clinton was then Governor of New York. While he was in the legislature the bill came before the house to put in a canal, from Lake Erie to the Atlantic. When the vote was called, my fathers name commencing with "A" was one of the first. When Adams was called, he got up and responded with great dignity, his answer which was "Nay".

That winter my father was in Albany he came home sick, about the time for the Holidays. The Doctor said he had a high fever and his head had to be shaved. By the time he got well and able to go back, his hair was too short to braid into a queue. 'Do he bought a braid of false hair which was often done in those days. When he got back to Albany, it had gone out of fashion for men to wear their hair long, so his false hair was of no use. Every one had their hair cut off, so he was just in the style.

The next summer after lie returned from Albany he took a trip on horse back into the Genesee Country. Two gentlemen went with him the same way and all calculated that if they liked the country to buy new land. They gave a glowing description of the Genesee Country when they returned and said it was fine land to raise winter wheat. My father went again the next summer season and bought 160 acres of land. He went the third time and drove a team through on a big wagonload of things for a camp outfit, and when he came back he left Prince to help a man put up hay for the coming winter. Great preparations were now made, to move the family to the new Genesee Country. By that time there was a new member to the family, which was a boy named William Henry Harrison, but was always called Harrison. I think we moved from the home at the foot of Pine Hill, to the Genesee Country, in the year 1814 or 1815. The land my father bought was nearly all woods but of course it could be cleared up in time. It was about two miles from the small village of Mt. Morris, in the County of Livingston. Of course there is always a great excitement in getting a family ready to take a journey. I well remember the morning we started out with two loads, and bid goodbye to the dear old home, and the murmur of old Shenlaken creek. My mother had yarn spun and made into plaid woolen for the girls dresses with vandykes made to match, something like the capes worn at the present time, and the dresses were long. We must have looked funny all dressed alike as there, was Laura Ann and myself Joannah, and Ann Maria also Angeline and Betsey Ann. Then there were the boys, Aaron and the youngest Harrison. The black folks had horses and wagon to themselves. I don't remember how many days we were on the road going, but I know we went through great woods, and rivers to ford. They used to build campfires at night, and in the morning to cook the meals. We children thought everything was fine cooked on the coals. We were a very happy family and sometimes the woods rang with our gay laughter and songs we sang. They could not drive many miles in a day and we walked sometimes for miles and when we got tired would climb up in the back part of the covered wagon we rode in. If my father could have looked into the future and have seen the trouble that came by the move into the new country come to us children, he would have turned back to the old home at the foot of Pine Hill. Perhaps it is the best thing that we cannot look ahead of us as it might not bring any happiness into our lives as we journey through the world.

After a long slow journey we reached Mt. Morris, where my father got us a place to live until he could build a house upon the land. It took only a few weeks to put up the house, and then we moved up in the woods. A huge fire place was made in the kitchen, and I have seen a big back log drawn in by a horse. We children were delighted with the woods and near by a little stream ran. When the cool frosty weather came we used to gather hickory nuts and also hazel nuts of which there was a great quantity, It was really a wild country and there was scarcely any roads through the forest. To a place about ten miles away called Nunda we had to go by marked trees. The Indians were all around us, and they used to bother my mother coming and begging for bread, and also teasing my father for tobacco. We soon learned many of the Indian words, and they all seemed to be very friendly, although years before there was an outbreak in that part of the state. I don't know how long we had lived on that new farm before our days and years of trouble began, but I think it was the next summer, when my father was having some land cleared up that my mother was taken sick. She had what at that time was called typhus fever, and was sick only a short time when she died leaving a little baby girl called Caroline Antoinette. She seemed to take to me more than all the rest to I took the whole care of her. It was a sad day when my father and all the children followed her to the grave in the cemetery at Mt. Morris.

Shortly after her death, my father was taken sick with the same fever and in two weeks after my mother died we were all standing around his bed and he was breathing his last. He was laid away by my mother that mark their resting place.

My father had his mind up to the last breath and talked to my sister Laura and myself giving us all the advice he was able as to our course of action when we were left alone. He could not tell us just what we should do, as he did not know himself. All he could say was that he left us in the hands of a wise and good God, to guide us in the future. My father held to the faith of the Universalist church, and very strong in his belief. A few days after his death the Presbyterian Minister from Mt. Morris came to console us and made a long prayer to God to watch over us and then he exorted us to become good Christians and not follow our fathers example. "Why girls," he said, "You have no reason to believe only that your father is amongst the dammed in Hell." Now that was not very consoling when we were in such trouble and did not know what to do. A long time before Prince had run away and Sarah and all her family had gone (as she was a free negro) and poor Tom took sick and died, so we children were left all alone in the wilderness.

Of course the people were very good to us but they were all new settlers and had all they could do. My father had many of his Free Mason members who came and offered their services in any way to help us. One of them, a Mr. Lake was appointed administrator of the estate, but nothing could be done, until the youngest child should be of age. They all advised us to sell the personal property, and about that time slaves were freed in New York so we had none then, Prince came back before my father died and wanted his master to take him back, but my father said "No Prince you have chosen your way go take care of yourself." Then some of our relatives came and all advised us to break up, as we could not live in the woods with Indians all around us. So we divided up and the children were taken here and there amongst the relations. I have almost forgotten how it was all arranged but I took my baby sister Caroline and went home with Uncle Nathan Adams. Angeline went to Aunt Gregories in Connecticut, and Maria and little Betsey went to Aunt Abigail Taylors, my fathers sister who were poor and had a big family of their own, but were clever folks and good to them. My brother Aaron went to grandfather Bonesteels at Sopus and Harrison was taken home with Uncle Joe. My sister Laura had a very good education for those days and taught a country school not far from Uncle Nathans and so was able to care for herself. We were all parted, and never lived together again. My uncle Nathan and Aunt Lucinda had a big family of their own and of course I felt that I was not very welcome. Caroline was a great trouble to take care of and used to worry and cry a great share of the time. I shed many tears over the poor little thing and the family were not very kind to her, To add to all my trouble I was taken sick with a fever, and unable to take care of her. As soon as I was able to I went to a strangers and took Caroline with me and worked for my board, and they were very good to us.

Whatever became of the money got from the sale of the personal property I never knew 'but I could guess it went into the pockets of the numerous relatives. I know we needed many things for our comfort which we never had (that is) myself and baby sister, Caroline. We never saw each other very often until we were grown up, and then we used to visit each other. Maria and Angeline lived to be old maids and have lived at different times together for years.

3 
Adoption* 1 
Married Name Frank1 
Name Variation Jane4 
Birth*18 May 1804 Livingston Manor, Ulster Co., New York, USA5,4,3,6 
Education*c 1810 Pine Hill, Ulster Co., New York; I must have been about six years old when I was sent to school which was about two miles from our place. I must have been a quaint little maid, with a pressed flannel dress which came down to the top of my shoes, and I wore a square of plaid flannel for my wrap. The school house was built of logs and on one side of the large room was a fire place of huge dimensions, where the fire of blazing logs sent a warm glow all over the room when the weather was cold. The schoolmaster was an old man by the name of Dyer, and he ruled the school with the rod, and every day a bunch of birch sprouts helped to keep good order in the school room. I was always glad when night came and I trudged along on my way home. Often in the cold weather there was an old couple who would be going along home and would ask me to ride. There was only one seat in the sleigh and this good old Quaker lady always carried a foot stove (as they were called those times.) A little affair with coals put in on which to keep the feet warm. She would say "Thee can sit on Phoebe Stinsons stove". In those days this little stove was very handy to take to the meeting house on Sunday as they used to have no way of warming the room, as only fire places were used in the dwelling houses, to keep warm by or cook everything.2 
Education Woodstock, Ulster Co., New York; I was sent to my grandfathers to go to school at Woodstock, but I got homesick after a few weeks and nothing would console me. All the comforts of this well ordered home, and even a good supply of bread and butter and honey, would not make up for the pleasures of my own home. I wanted to see the black folks even and there was Sarah and her pickininnies who always amused me, playing around the brook. The negroes used to have such a lot of fun in the great kitchen in the winter evenings. There was always a big blazing fire in the great fire place burning. We used to love to go in and see the fun and Prince was always playing his jokes on the others. Poor old Tom was very fond of baked potatoes, and he would put some in the hot ashes and then lie down on the floor, with his feet to the fire and then go to sleep. Prince would watch and as soon as their potatoes were done, and take them out and eat them, and put some new raw ones in their place. After a while Tom would wake up and go see to his potatoes and find they were not done so he would put some more hot ashes over them and lay down again, and soon would be fast asleep. Sometimes mischievous Prince would put raw potatoes a number of times, but good honest Tom would wait patiently for his feast of baked potatoes.

When I had been at school nearly a year, staying with my grandparents, my father and mother came to see me, and I saw for the first time my baby sister called Betsey Ann. She was a little chubby thing with black eyes and hair. I was so homesick that I cried the most of the time while they were there. I told my father it was a wart on my finger that hurt so that it made me cry. My father decided to take me home. As soon as we were on our way, I found out that there was no more pain in that wart.2 
Residencebt 1814 - 1815 Mount Morris, Livingston Co., New York; I think we moved to the Genesee country from the home at the foot of Pine Hill in 1814-15.2 
Marriage*24 Oct 1824 Principal=Jacob Frank2,7 
(Witness) Adoption18 Dec 1833 Principal=Joannah Elisabeth Adams1 
Land Tx*24 Oct 1835 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York; Grantors: Jacob and Joannah, his wife

Grantee: Gaylord Willsey

25 acres on the west end of lot 152 and 31.25 acres in lots 159 and 151 (all of their rights to the estate of Aaron Adams).

$2,450; Principal=Jacob Frank, Witness=Gaylord Willsey8 
Residence* Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA; Laura and Gaylord Willsey and Joannah and Jacob Frank moved together back to their earlier home in Mt. Morris, NY and bought the heirs rights to the land there (excepting 40 acres which Laura and Joannah's brother Aaron retained). They built a tavern there.2 
Residence1849 LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA2 
Residence1850 LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA4 
Residence1860 LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Enumerated in the household of Pared and Emeline Patchen, along with her husband, Frank, her nephew (and foster son), Walter F. Adams, and her niece's daughter, Minnie M. Hubbard.5 
Residence1870 Hudson/Lyons, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Household in 1870:

Frank, Jacob, 70, without occupation, born MD
Frank, Joanna, 66, keeping home, born NY
Morgan, Ann, 64, without occupation, born NY
Adams, Angeline, 59, without occupation, born NY9 
Residencebt 1876 - 1900 Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; Joannah's obituary says that she had resided in the country for 24 years.7 
Residence1880 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; Census: Keeping home. Enumerated with her sisters Ann and Angeline and with Joanna (visitor) and the for Rowe children who were "at school."10 
Residence1895 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota; Age 85, born in New York. Enumerated in the household of her niece, Elisabeth Rowe.11 
Death*31 Mar 1900 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; Obituary for Joannah Adams Frank
Redwood Falls Gazette, Redwood Falls, MN
Published 4 April 1900

Death of Mrs. Frank
Relative of President Adams Passes Away at 96 Years:

Mrs. Joannah Adams Frank passed away at the home of her niece, Mrs. L.N. Rowe of Broadway, this city, about ten o'clock last Saturday evening. Old age was the cause of death, Mrs. Frank lacking a month of being 96 years old when she passed into the great beyond.

Mrs. Frank appeared to be in excellent health, with the exception of rheumatic trouble, up to a month ago when the changeable spring weather forced her to bed, and since that time she declined rapidly. For a week prior to the end her death was momentarily expected.

The funeral occurred from the residence at 1 o'clock Monday afternoon, Rev. F.J. Harackman of the First Presbyterian church, conducting the services. Interment occurred in the Redwood cemetery.

Mrs. Joanna Frank was born May 18, 1804 in Ulster county, N.Y. Her father was Aaron Adams, a leader in the affairs of the county and for many years honored with the office of judge. He served also in the New York State legislature during the governorship of DeWitt Clinton 1824-28. Mrs. Frank belonged to that strain of the Adams family which has produced patriots, governors and presidents, her father's father being a cousin of John Adams, the second President of the United States. In the early part of the century the Adams family moved from Ulster count to the Genesee country in Western New York at a time when Indians were the principle inhabitants of that country. While the were there Mrs. Frank's parents both contracted typhoid fever and died, leaving the children to care for themselves in that wild, inhospitable region.

Mr. Jacob Frank and Miss Joanna Adams were joined in marriage Oct 24, 1824 and lived together until 1875 when Mr. Frank died at the age of 81 years. They therefore celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding a year before the husband's death. No children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank, but their home was gladdened by the gift to them of a little girl two years old from another home. This little girl's father was Mrs. Frank's brother and her mother was a young school teacher whom Mrs. Frank befriended and nursed through a long sick spell. The gift of the baby girl to Mrs. Frank was the mother's expression of gratitude to her benefactress. This baby girl is now Mrs. L.N. Rowe of Redwood Falls with whom Mrs. Frank spent her last days. Mrs. Frank has been a resident of Redwood Falls for the last 24 years and has lived most of that time in Redwood Falls.

The author of the following biography is not known. It appears to have been written in Redwood Falls, Minnesota (mention of "this city") shortly after Johanna's death (March 31, 1900). My copy comes from a desecendent of Johann'as neice, Jim Buxton, in Kalispell, Montana, and it is a retyped copy, so I have not seen the original.

Age of Ninety-Six

Mrs. Jacob Frank Expired Saturday After a Brief Illness.
Deceased was The Most Interesting Personage in the State.
Clearly Remembers Incidents of Ninety-four Years Ago.
Was a Relative of John Adams, the Second President.

Mrs. Jacob Frank died Saturday evening a t 9 P.M. after an illness of two weeks, at the home of her adopted daughter, Mrs. L.N. Rowe, at the extreme old age of 96 years.

Up to within a few weeks of her death Mrs. Frank had always enjoyed good health, but about the 15th of March she contracted a severe cold which setting in her lungs, resulted disastrous. The funeral was held the following Monday afternoon from the residence and was conducted by Rev. Franklin Barackman, pastor of the Presbyterian church.

Mrs. Frank was undoubtedly the most interesting personage in the state, not alone because of her age, but owing to the relationship that existed between her and the departed patriots of the eighteenth century who did so much for our country and in the cause of freedom. Her anecdotes, stories told her principally by her father, Aaron Adams, while yet a girl, savor of the courtly etiquette of chivalrous times, when honor was all and the god, mammon, was forced to remain in the background. Her clothes were ________ and frilled shirt fronts and cuffs. They smacked of the day when the stage coach was considered a most wonderful vehicle for swiftness, and of the time when dueling was the gentlemen's privilege, and every man worthy of the name carried a sword. Her mind was stored with historic events, which had transpired in their day and time. Her memory was very retentive and within a few hours of her death, she could recall to mind, incidents of her baby days. She loved to dwell on the time ninety-four years ago, when she was but two years old, she did some deed which her infant mind knew to be wrong.

Besides having a mind stored with recollections of by gone days, Mrs. Frank was able to grasp and talk of late discussion in the scientific and spiritual world. She was a profound thinker and a great reader.

The deceased whose maiden name was Johanna Adams, was the daughter of Aaron Adams, and was born in Ulster county, New York , on the 18th day of May, 1804. Her grandfather was a cousin of John Adams, the second president of the United States, and was himself a veteran of the Revolutionary war. He belonged to a race of men who knew no fear, who hated bondage with all the fierce hatred of their restless spirits. Even before the Revolutionary war, the Adamses had been noted for their upright bearing, and during the dark days of liberty's strife, none stood so firmly for freedom, and none fought so nobly in her cause. Aaron Adams was himself a legislator to the York State capitol. He was one of the members who voted to have the Erie Canal built, and in a number of decisive actions showed his loyalty to his principals and his thoughtful care _________ for the future generations. Mr. Adams was also a county judge and served as an officer in the war of 1812. Johanna Adams lived with her parents in Ulster country until she became 12 years of age, when she moved to the then wilds of western New York. Here the family lived until two years later, when within a few weeks of each other. both Mr. and Mrs. Adams died. At the age of 20 Johanna married Jacob Frank, a thrifty German who became a prominent citizen in Mount Morris, New Yorks, and several towns in New Jersey and New Hampshire, operating a glass factories (sic), being himself a glass blower.

In 1849 Mr. and Mrs. Frank moved, accompanied by their adopted daughter, their neice, now Mrs. Rowe, to Walworth county, Wisconsin, where they remained until October 1875, when the husband died.

Mrs. Frank shortly after came to this country and made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Rowe in Sundown. Here she remained until 1880, when she accompanied her daughter and family to this city, she has since resided here.

Besides coming from good stock on her father's side, Mrs. Frank's ancestry from her Mother's name was Elizabeth Bohnstein [corrected by another hand to Bonesteel] and she was the daughter of an aristocratic German family, whose descendants today are among the wealthiest citizens of Chicago and the East, many of them holding high governmental positions.

12,7 
Burial*2 Apr 1900 Redwood Cemetery, Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; Cemetery stone is 3.5 feet tall with a Bible on top12,7 

Family

Jacob Frank b. c 1800, d. 1875
Marriage*24 Oct 1824 Principal=Jacob Frank2,7 

Citations

  1. [S180] Author Unknown, Brief "Adams" Genealogy (unpublished notes in possession of Dixie Hansen), Date Unknown,.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911, p 1.
  4. [S22] 1850 US Census, Wisconsin,.
  5. [S18] 1860 US Census, WI,.
  6. [S196] Shawn Corder Dixie Hansen. 10 January 2001, Redwood County Genealogical Society, 217 W Flynn St, Redwood Falls, MN 56283. 1411 Osceola Ave, Saint Paul, Ramsey Co., Minnesota, USA Birthdate from cemetery stone.
  7. [S197] Redwood Gazette, Redwood Falls, MN 4 April 1900.
  8. [S421] , Volume 15, page 133.
  9. [S77] 1870 US Census, WI,.
  10. [S15] 1880 US Census, WI,.
  11. [S183] 1895 Minnesota State Census, Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, page 5.
  12. [S196] Shawn Corder Dixie Hansen. 10 January 2001, Redwood County Genealogical Society, 217 W Flynn St, Redwood Falls, MN 56283. 1411 Osceola Ave, Saint Paul, Ramsey Co., Minnesota, USA.

Joannah Elisabeth Adams1,2

F, b. 28 December 1831, d. 23 February 1915
Joannah Elizabeth "Lizzie" (Adams) Hubbard Rowe
1831-1915
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams3 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherMary Ann Budington4,5 b. 16 May 1809, d. c 1844
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Frank Valentine Hubbard
Name Variation J. Elizabeth6 
Biography* MEMORIES OF JOANNAH ADAMS HUBBARD ROWE

Here the narrative of Joannah Frank seemed to close I and I really don't know the reason, but I think it was the death of Aunt Angeline who was staying at our house. Poor old lady, she was 86 years old when she fell down and broke a hip, and after being helpless for over a year, went to sleep on Tuesday and never woke up but lived until Friday, when her pure spirit passed away. She had been a member of the Methodist church since she was a young girl and was always a sincere Christian, and put her trust in God, always saying when in great trouble and helpless, "God will take care of me,"

I can remember many incidents in the lives of this Adams family which may be of interest to the readers of these memories. The lives and fortunes of this family would fill a large book, but a few closing remarks might be useful as well as entertaining in remembrance of things that occurred.

Laura Ann Adams was teaching school in Tioga County, New York, when she met a young man by the name of Gaylord Willsey, and they were soon lovers, and after her school closed, they were married. Betsey Ann and Caroline went to live with them. Gaylord had a brother Warren who fell in love with Angeline when she came to visit her sister Laura. They would have been married but the friends on both sides thought to marry one out of a family was the limit so old Mr. Jacob Willsey and his wife succeeded in breaking it up. Angeline went back to Aunt Ellen Gregory in Connecticut and after a while Warren married a girl who lived in that town. Years after when they had a large family, his wife died and the next year Angeline was out on a visit to her sister, and Warren proposed again. Angeline decided she did not care to be a stepmother and help bring up a family of children, so she still remained an old maid to the day of her death.

I have heard her tell often of her mothers family, the Bonesteels that some remembrance of them may be of interest. Her mother was Elisabeth Bonesteel, and she had a sister who married a man by the name of Sheldon. He was General Sheldon and he moved from New York state some time in the 40's to Janesville, Wisconsin. It seems there were three of the Sheldon girls. One of them, Cornelia, married a man by the name of Woodle, and he was quite a noted lawyer and resided many years in Janesville. One of the girls married a gentleman in Chicago J. T. Scammon who was a wealthy man and lived in great style, he other one of the three married a rich man in Chicago by the name of Mayland Ogden. He had a square of land in the best part of the city with a beautiful house, and when the great fire was in Chicago it burnt up all sides around him but his place was not burnt. He had a brother William B. Ogden who was very wealthy and was a railroad king, and the city of Ogden was named after him. He was an old bachelor all of his life. Mrs. Sheldon had a brother Philip Bonesteel who lived a few miles from the city of Rochester, New York. He was a rich man and had a beautiful stone house and a large peach orchard. His property went to a son Peter and he lived there many years. Uncle Philip was a very fat man, and whatever places he visited he had a great chair made and sent there for him to sit in when he was at the house. It seems that after Joannah Adams got tired of staying with her fathers relatives she went to her grandfather Bonesteels. One day when she was about 18 years old she was spinning yarn one warm day and she was bare foot. A stranger came in and her grandfather knew him and introduced him as Jacob Frank, a young German from Baltimore. She was very much ashamed because she was barefoot but she sat down, and put her feet under the chair as well as she could. She took notice that this young Mr. Jacob Frank was dressed in fine clothes and looked very stylish in every way, and had oft (what was then called pumps) on his feet and white silk stockings.

At all events he fell in love at the first sight and came again, and again, and proposed to Joannah to be his wife. In a year they were married, and grandfather Bonesteel got the wedding dress, which was a striped silk in shades of blue. They went to some place in New Jersey, and went to housekeeping. He was by trade a glass blower and had work in a large glass factory. He was a skillful workman and had big wages always at his trade. His parents came from Germany but he was born at the town of Frederick town made noticeable from Whittiers poem of Barbara Fritschie at the time Stonewall Jackson marched through with the rebel troops, and the old lady put the stars and stripes out of the window. When the soldiers were going to fire at it, she said, "Shoot if you must, this old gray head, but spare my Country's flag, she said."

I don't remember what year that Joannah Frank went from New Jersey to Willsey Ville in New York state to visit her sitter Laura Ann Willsey and then they planned to go back to Mt. Morris on the farm their father bought of 160 acres. They planned to build a house and have the land broken up and make a home there. After a time these two families went there and bought off the right of the Heirs, excepting Aaron who took 40 acres for his share. Then Gaylord Willsey and Jacob Frank moved off the old house and built a large house to be used as a tavern, and when it was done they moved in and furnished it and fixed everything in a good shape. About that time a family moved into the neighborhood by the name of Buddington. He had been for many years an old sea Captain. He had a family brought up I think in Massachusetts and had a good education. It seems by some bad calculation or a streak of bad luck old Captain Buddington had lost a good property so came to the west to start over again in Livingston County in New York state. He bought a small farm a few miles from Mt. Morris, near the Willsey and Frank place. I don't just remember the names of them all but the old lady was Whoda and there were of the boys Clauson, Walter, Bonaparte, Albert and one they called Buster, and I don't remember what I was told his real name was. Then there were three girls, Mary, Jeanette, and Adeline. Mary got the school in that district and as they lived a long ways from the school, she boarded with Mrs. Frank. They say she was fine looking with a fair complexion and light brown hair and blue eyes. After a few months she was taken down suddenly with a Rover and Mrs. Frank took care of her, and after she became better, she declared that it was to Mrs. Franks kind care, she owed her life, and she wondered what she could do to repay her. Mrs. Frank was wishing one day that some one would give her a baby girl which she could adopt as her own. Mary Buddington said "Mrs. Frank, I am going to give you a solemn promise, if I ever get married and have any children, the first girl I have, I shall give to you to adopt and have for your very own, to return your kindness in saving my life." Mrs. Frank only laughed, but she little thought it would ever come true. Strange as it may seem her brother Aaron came about that time to see his sisters Laura Ann and Joannah. He was a lively young fellow, with black eyes and black curly hair. He was always good natured and full of fun, and as soon as he set his eyes on the blue eyed Mary he fell in love at first sight. It was not many months after, when Mary Buddington became the wife of Aaron Adams, and they went to keeping house in a little new log house on the 40 acres of land that Aaron took as his share of the estate of his father. In the first few years of their married life they had two boys and one died and then there was a baby girl. Jacob Frank and Joannah had gone that fall to New Jersey where he had work in a glass factory to earn money to help build on the farm at Mt. Morris. In the month of January she had a letter from Mary, her brothers wife that they had a little girl who was born on December 28, 1831. She said the baby was hers (if she wanted it) and to send it a name and she would take care of it, until Mrs. Frank wanted to take her home as her very own. She told her the baby was a pretty black eyed little girl. Mrs. Frank sent her the name of Joannah Elisabeth, and when she was two years old the Franks came back to the old place. They were very much pleased with this little Elisabeth, and wanted to have her for their own but Mrs. Frank hesitated about holding Mary to her promise made some years ago. She saw that the family of her brother thought so much of the little girl and she and her brother Gaylord took so much comfort playing together. Her brother Oscar Henry was born that winter and they sent the little Lizzie (as they called her) up to the big house to stay a few days. Then her father came after her to see her little brother. After she had looked at him she wanted to go back, but a terrible storm came so she could not be taken that night. Lizzie cried and made such a fuss that in the morning her father took her back. When they got in sight of the house, Mrs. Frank was out on the porch, and as soon as Lizzie saw her she jumped down from her fathers arms and run as fast as she could saying to her father, "There's my Ma," and she would not go back to stay at home again. Her mother said Joannah should keep her.

The writer of these memories was that little Lizzie Adams, named by my Aunt Joannah, Joannah Elisabeth Adams. When I was a small girl my Uncle Jacob Frank and Aunt Joannah went for a few years to Keene, New Hampshire, where he had work in a large glass factory. He wanted to earn money to pay the, debts on the farm as they had bought off the Heirs. My Uncle Gaylord Willsey and Aunt Laura Ann staid on the farm. I was adopted into the family of Jacob and Joannah Frank December 18th, 1833.

While we were away my father sold his 40 acres, and moved to a part of Michigan which was then a new country and in a dense forest. I think it was near a place called Flint and new folks the Buddingtons had moved there some time before. I never saw my mother as I can remember) but when we took the stage to go to the Genesee Valley Canal to go to Rochester on our journey to Keene, I looked out of the stage window and I saw a woman standing a ways over a field, by a fence, with her apron over her eyes. I think it must have been my mother looking up to the road to see as go away and it was the last time she ever saw her little daughter.

My first school days were at Keene where I went to what was then called an Infant school. The little girls took their dolls and there were settees all around the room where the little children used to take their naps every day. I had a boy chum a little older than I and his name was Abel Stone. He used to carry my books and dinner pail to the school room and then he went to the public school which he attended. The few years we lived at Keene were every pleasant, and often look back to them.

I think I was 7 years old when P and Ma (as I always called them) went back to Mt. Morris to the old homestead. I well remember the journey over the Green Mountains where great rocks rose up on each side of the road, and often a little spring would gush out from some creek in a rock and go down the sides in a little river. I would get so thirsty that Ma would get the stage driver to stop and she would take me out, to hold my cup under the stream. I also remember having dinner at a hotel on top of the mountains where the driver would change horses and the change was made every ten miles all the way. I think we went to a place called Troy where we took a packet boat on the Genesee Valley Canal for Mt. Morris. When my parents moved to Michigan they left my brother Oscar Henry Adams with Aunt Laura. When my brother Horace Buddington Adams was a small baby, Oscar was sent up to the big house to stay a few days with Aunt Laura and he liked it so well he wanted to stay, so Uncle Gaylord Willsey and Aunt Laura took Oscar to bring up. When we got to the old home I was so glad to find a brother, and we soon became fast friends and playmates. My mother used to often write to us and she told of being blind the most of the time so she could scarcely see to write. I shed many tears when I grew older to think my poor mother was off in the woods deprived of so much in life, while myself and Oscar Henry had all the comforts. One day there came a letter on which the postage of 25 cents had not been paid. It was from my mother and she told how their house got on fire and everything burnt up leaving them destitute as they lost all of their clothes and bed clothing and in that new country of course there was no insurance. Right away after the letter came my aunts went to work and packed a large box with bed clothing and other useful things and sent it to them. I remember how Ma used to cry over the things as she packed them, to think they were so poor off in the Michigan woods. Then there came another letter telling of their little girl Mary who was two years old and always was well until the day she died. She was taken with fits and they could not save her life. I never had a, sister but had five brothers. When I was about eleven years old, my mother died suddenly. A few weeks after her death my oldest brother Gaylord Willsey Adams came alone to our place. He had never been to school but a short time and his aunts made him clothes and sent him to the district school in our neighborhood with myself and Oscar. After a year or so my Uncle Gaylord Willsey got him a place to learn the trade of a harness maker, and when he was old enough to set up a shop for himself and done a good business as he was quite an expert making fine harness, and there were no sewing machines then. The same year my brother Gaylord came from Michigan, our brother Horace only a small boy only about ten years old, came from Michigan to find his brothers and he was a strange to us all. Uncle Gaylord Willsey and Aunt Laura took him to bring up with Oscar. Then a few weeks after my father came with the youngest boy Walter?about four years old and gave him to his Aunt Joannah to care for. Aunt Joannah felt so sorry for the poor little neglected follow she took him as her own. There was one boy who was older than Walter, who was left in Michigan with one of my mothers brothers, Bonaparte Buddington, who went to California and left Lawrence Dezang Adams with his brother Walter but as soon as Lawrence was old enough he went away and began to shift for himself. He became lost to all of his relations in New York State. Now the lives these brothers of mine, would make a large book, so I will just give a little account of what became of them, also the end of my fathers career, who always seemed to have bad luck in anything he undertook. His life seemed to be a hard one all through but I hope he is happy in that summer land to which we are all hastening.

It was only a few times in my life that I ever saw my father Aaron Bonesteel Adams. After he left little Walter with his Aunt Joannah, he went off west and it was a few years that we heard nothing from him. I think it was about six years after my mothers death that he married again. She was a widow by the name of Brown and had a family, six children mostly grown up. She had a farm at a place called Omro in Wisconsin not many miles from Oshkosh. He went there and lived, and helped work the farm. In this marriage there were two children, a boy Frank and a girl Charlotte. I was there when they were small but don't know what ever became of them. When the Civil War broke out in 1861, the two oldest of the Brown boys enlisted, and my father went into the army with them. In a year after he was taken sick and died in a hospital in Evansville, Indiana and his remains lie in an unknown grave. I have often remembered him on Decoration days and hung up a wreath with his name, on the monument for the unknown.

Gaylord W. Adams was successful in his trade as harness maker, married but had not children Just in the prime of life he had a stroke of paralysis and lay helpless for about three years and then passed away at Candon, Tioga Co., New York. My brother Oscar Henry Adams was from his earliest boyhood a natural doctor and also had a love for the sea and his spare time when out of school was spent in making ships and fixing pills and medicine to put in his little tin trunk. When he was old enough Uncle Gaylord Willsey sent him to New York City to study medicine. He did not stay there long but put out to sail away, first to Cuba and afterward to go as supercargo on a ship to China. After he had roamed about the world until he was satisfied he took up his studies again, and went to France and got his diploma there. The Crimean War had broken out and he enlisted as a Surgeon on the greatest ship that then sailed the Atlantic. The French hired this ship "The Great Republic" of the United States to carry soldiers out to the seat of war and bring the wounded back. He was also a Surgeon in the Civil War in a New York regiment. He was cut on the head with a saber in the hands of a guerrilla when helping to gather the wounded on a battlefield. He saved his life by making the Free Masons sign, and guerrilla chief was a Mason too, and he took him to his place and cared for him until he was well He was married before he went into the army and had two children: one boy Arthur and a girl, Elizabeth but always called Libbie. About a years after he came back from the war he opened an office at Elmira N. Y. and practiced medicine a number of years. While treating a man
for a malignant cancer he caught that awful cancer for which there has never been found a cure. It broke out on his cheek and he told his folks there was no help for it, but they insisted on his having it cut out, So to please his wife Lucy he went to Rochester and had it cut out but it soon grew again, and eat into his mouth until his teeth all dropped out, and then into the grain and he died in great agony with his hands raised up to Heaven. Just in the prime of life, only about 44 years old and I had not seen him in nearly 30 years but he sent me messages he told his wife on every breeze that blew westward. I shall see him when I cross over to the other side and' we shall have so much to tell each other of our life on this earth.

Horace Buddington Adams was two years younger than Oscar Henry and was also brought up by Uncle Gaylord Willsey and Aunt Laura.

He was a graduate of the Urbanna University in Ohio. His aunt sent him there because the school was inclined to the religion she was a firm member in that is the New Church as it was called and they were believers and followers of the faith taught by Emanuel Sweden burg, a faith so deep to understand for they read the Bible and understood the meaning by correspondences. After all his education he wanted to learn the trade of a tinner at which he worked for many years and when the Civil War broke out he went as bugler in a band belong to a New York regiment. Afterward he had a hardware store in Oswego, N.Y. where he has lived ever since and now while I am writing he has a home there, and his two grown up boys run the store. He was married after the war and has raised a large family now grown up and married of which I know nothing of for I have only seen him once in the course of 40 years.

Next in the family of Aaron and Mary Adams came Lawrence Dezand Adams who was born in Michigan while his three older brothers were born in Mt. Morris, Livingston Co,, N. Y. We knew nothing of his place of residence until a few years before the Civil War my brother Horace came to Wisconsin to see me and my family, also Uncle Jacob Frank and Aunt Joannah. When he returned to New York State he went through Michigan and after a lot of trouble he found Lawrence who had grown up to be a very nice looking young man, and was doing a good business in one of the parts of Lake Michigan where he was inspector of fish. After the war broke out we could hear nothing of him, and we began to think he had gone into the army and was killed and lay in an unknown grave. Years passed away, and it was in the year 1904 that. I had a letter from my brother Horace who lived at Oswego, N.Y. saying he had news that our brother Lawrence was alive and lived at Belleville Ontario. It seems after the war which he was in, that he married and went to Belleville Ontario, Canada. They had but one child a daughter, who was 40 years old and married to Robert Leonard for many years. She felt a great desire to know if her father had any relatives in any place, and she read in a paper that a lady in some place in Connecticut was getting up that is called a "family tree" of the Adams. family. My brothers daughter Alice had a number of names sent to her upon her writing to this woman and asking for some names of people of that name. She wrote to many of them and one was Harrison Adams and it was her grandfathers brother as it proved. She wrote to him, but he had been dead many years and had only one son living. He took the letter and read it and sent it to my brother Horace so we found out all about our missing brother. In the summer of 1405 1 went from Minnesota to visit my daughter Minnie Smith and as had got that far, I went on to Belleville in Ontario and found my brother and his wife and daughter Mrs. Alice Leonard.? I had a good visit on the first and last time I ever met my brother. My brother Horace came up from Oswego and we all met at my brothers and I have not seen Horace for forty years.

When I last saw Horace, he was a good looking young man and when I met him at Belleville, he was a little old man whom I should never have known, had I met him at any place. In the year 1911 my brother Lawrence and his wife both passed away, and I was so glad that I went to see them once, also their daughter Alice, wife of Robert Leonard.

Walter Frank Adams was brought up by Uncle Jacob, and Aunt Joannah Frank and as soon as he was old enough he went to learn the tinners trade at Stevens Point of Horace who came from New York State there to work at his trade. After a few years he went to Chicago and got work. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in Taylors Battery of light artillery. After the close of the war he came to Springfield, Wisconsin and set up a shop of his own. At the close of the year he married a pretty girl who was then teaching school" there. Her name was Loe Owens and she lived only about ten years. They had three children of whom two died leaving Clarence whom Walter loved dearly. He had moved to Clinton, Iowa where his wife died. After a few years he married again to a lady who was a widow and I don't remember her name only he called her Susie and they moved to Toledo, Ohio, where he kept a hardware store many years. Clarence grew up to be a bright handsome young man, and after he left school he went down to some place in Texas and worked on a railroad train ad brakeman. About a year after I think he was taken with small pox and died there which almost?broke his fathers heart and he lived only a few years after his death. Walter was born in 1839 and died in 1903. 1 saw him only once in 28 years when I went two years before he died to Toledo and spent a week at his?beautiful home where his wife Susie is now living in the year 1911.

I must go back a little in the course of events. In the year 1849, our folks sold the farm near Mt. Morris for $8000 and the two families of Jacob Frank and Aunt Joannah and Uncle Gaylord Willsey and Punt Laura, who had lived there together many years. Uncle Gaylord and Punt Laura went to Willsey Ville Tioga Co., and took my brother Oscar and Horace with them. Oscar was 16 years old when we parted and I never saw him again. My foster parents immigrated to Wisconsin and Walter and myself went along I was first married in that fall and so of course my husband went also. As I was born in 1831 it made me a young and green wife, and my husband was only 20 so we were not very capable to get on very well in the world ? only a boy and girl, and our future which is well known by all should be an example for those who come after against early marriages, My husbands father Alfred Hubbard went with us and we went by team about 60 miles to Buffalo and there took a fine steam boat for Milwaukee. My folks bought a farm 36 miles from Milwaukee, in La Grange Walworth County. The farm lay by beautiful Lake Pleasant . The money got from selling the old farm at Mt. Morris, and the sale of the horses, cows, and sheep and farming utensils was divided between the two families of Jacob Frank and Gaylord Willsey. The furniture was divided the same and our folks moved all of theirs also took a big wagon and new covered buggy. Mrs. was all summer in getting ready to go to the new country and she dried a great quantity of all kinds of fruit. No one knew then, about canning fruit. They set out a fine orchard, so in a very few years they had plenty of apples, so they made cider and cider apple sauce which we thought so nice.

Thinking of the old farm in New York state I remember the life there and how different everything was managed than it was in the new country or nowadays amongst farmers. The ground was a clay soil and it was always ploughed two ways before the dragging was done both ways too. Then the grain was sowed by hand as there was no seeders or harvesters in those days. Corn was planted by hand and each hill carefully hoed. Hay and grain was cut by hand and when corn was ripe it was cut and all the stalks saved for the cattle. In the house during the summer the wool and flax was spun and the yarn for socks colored in the blue dye pot that stood in the kitchen. They used to take wool to the woolen mills and trade it for cloth and in the fall used to get a woman tailoress to come and sew, and she would stitch all day and press her seams with a goose (a big iron) heated on the coals by the. fire place in the dining room. There was a big brick oven in the kitchen where everything was baked and it was heated by long sticks of hickory wood and when the oven was hot enough a long shovel was used to clean it all out nicely ready for the bread and other things. The ashes were carefully put in a dry place made for them and every spring a leach was set up and wet down with water until strong lye run out and all the bits of grease were saved through the winter, so soft soap was made for the year.

Then in the winter before the Holidays there would be a great time butchering the hogs and a beef, and a great quantity would be hung out in the smoke house to keep fresh, while the hams and shoulders would be put in a brine, ready to be taken out when salt enough to smoke. The corned beef our folks used to prepare was the finest I have ever eaten since, Then a great quantity of sausage was made to eat with the buckwheat cakes for breakfast through the winter season, A big head cheese was made also pickled feet and liverworst was on the bill of fare all winter. The candle dipping day was always interesting to me. Candle wick was put on hickory rods about 8 to each one. Then they were put across two poles, resting on chairs. Hot tallow was put into a great big brass kettle and the women folks would sit and dip them in all day until enough tallow had cooled off on the wicks to make them the right size. As fast the tallow was used up, hot water was added to keep the kettle full, and enough were made to last all the year. In the long winter evenings the candle stand would be put near the f ire in the great dining room which was 20 feet square and two brass candle sticks with a brass tray and snuffers and the candles would burn until 9 o'clock and they had to have the wicks snuffed off to keep them burning brightly.

In the fall when the apples were gathered a number of wagon loads would be taken to the cider mill, and there was always one barrel of old cider that was made into good vinegar. The sweet apple cider was made, and they used to boil it down, and cook sweet apples cut into quarters, in the syrup and cooked and no better sauce would be made than the cider apple sauce, which lasted all winter.

What jolly times there used to be at Holiday time and how the relations would get together, The great brick oven in the kitchen would be heated with hickory wood, and turkeys, ducks, and chicken pies be baked and often a little pig. Before the other things would be baked for the table of mince and pumpkin pie, and on the stove close by, doughnuts would be fried made of raised dough with raisins in. Always on the Thanksgiving time an Indian baked pudding filled with raisins would grace the table. Some of aunts sisters would come for the Holidays with their husbands. Aunt Betsey who married a glass cutter by name Danniel Watterson Aunt Maria who married her brother?in?law Jedadiah Morgan. Aunt Caroline who died young leaving two children William and Mary Alphensene, and Aunt Maria took care of them always. Sometimes Uncle Harrison and his wife Luzette would come and always Aunt Angeline who lived an old maid and died at the good old age of 86.

Perhaps when some of my childrens grandchildren have read these memories, a Heavenly airship has come and taken me to that Summer Land where so many of' my dear ones have gone. My life since I left my native state, has had many ups and downs enough to fill a large book. I have been slowly drifting westward all the time and' never went back to my native state, New York, since I left in 1849. I have often been so homesick to see the old home at Mt. Morris, that I have thought if I could get only to the Genesee river and sit down on the shore, and breathe my last I would be happy. Many years I spent in Wisconsin and many more in Minnesota. I have been six years in Beautiful Spokane, in the family of my daughter Alice. It is now 1911, and my own home has been broken up 7 years. My husband gone over to the other side, and my children married. I have had all the comforts of life all these years here, and hopes for the future. Now as I close these memories, I know I am an old woman, and on the 28th of December 1911 1 shall have passed the 80th Mile stone on my lifes journey. I feel at peace with all the world, quietly waiting, yes! quietly waiting.'

     *Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe


*W.A.H.'s Grandmother (divorced wife of Grandfather Hubbard)


7 
Residence Keene, New Hampshire, USA8 
Married Name Hubbard 
Married Name Rowe 
Name Variation Lizzie 
Name Variation Elizabeth J. 
Birth*28 Dec 1831 probably Mount Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA; Birthdate and age are various reported throughout her life.

She is 18 in 1850 census (DOB=1832)
She is 27 in 1860 census (DOB = 1833)
She is 40 in 1875 census (DOB = 1835)
She is 47 in 1880 census (DOB = 1833)
She is 48 in 1885 census (DOB = 1837)
She is 68 in 1900 census (DOB = 1832) / Date is listed as Dec 1831
She is 75 in 1905 census (DOB = 1830)
Death Cert says DOB = 28 Dec 1831
9,10 
Adoption*18 Dec 1833 Witness=Joannah Adams, Witness=Jacob Frank3 
Residence1849 JEAHR: I must go back a little in the course of events. In the year 1849, our folks sold the farm near Mt. Morris for $8000 and the two families of Jacob Frank and Aunt Joannah and Uncle Gaylord Willsey and Aunt Laura, who had lived there together many years. Uncle Gaylord and Aunt Laura went to Willsey Ville Tioga Co., and took my brother Oscar and Horace with them. Oscar was 16 years old when we parted and I never saw him again. My foster parents immigrated to Wisconsin and Walter and myself went along I was first married in that fall and so of course my husband went also. As I was born in 1831 it made me a young and green wife, and my husband was only 20 so we were not very capable to get on very well in the world ? only a boy and girl, and our future which is well known by all should be an example for those who come after against early marriages. My husbands father Alfred Hubbard went with us and we went by team about 60 miles to Buffalo and there took a fine steam boat for Milwaukee. My folks bought a farm 36 miles from Milwaukee, in La Grange Walworth County. The farm lay by beautiful Lake Pleasant . The money got from selling the old farm at Mt. Morris, and the sale of the horses, cows, and sheep and farming utensils was divided between the two families of Jacob Frank and Gaylord Willsey. The furniture was divided the same and our folks moved all of theirs also took a big wagon and new covered buggy. Mrs. was all summer in getting ready to go to the new country and she dried a great quantity of all kinds of fruit. No one knew then, about canning fruit. They set out a fine orchard, so in a very few years they had plenty of apples, so they made cider and cider apple sauce which we thought so nice.8 
Marriage*5 Sep 1849 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York; Evelyn Burlingame lists marriage date as 4 September 1849.

JEAHR: My foster parents immigrated to Wisconsin and Walter and myself went along I was first married in that fall and so of course my husband went also. As I was born in 1831 it made me a young and green wife, and my husband was only 20 so we were not very capable to get on very well in the world ? only a boy and girl, and our future which is well known by all should be an example for those who come after against early marriages.; Groom=Julius Augustus Hubbard11,12,13 
Residence1850 LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Living with Julius her brother Walter and her 2 month old child, May (or Mary?). There is also a 19 year old female named Caroline Harford.14 
Residence*1860 Palmyra, Jefferson Co., Wisconsin; Note: This residence is a hotel run by Julius and Lizzie. One of the other residents is Nelson Rowe - a 21-year-old beekeeper from Vermont. Four years later Lizzie divorced Julius and married Nelson.15 
Note*Mar 1861 Julius Hubbard's complaint against Joannah says that she deserted him sometime in the month of March 1861.6 
Divorce*14 Jul 1864 Elkhorn, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Circuit Court, Walworth County
Julius Hubbard
agst.
J. Elizabeth Hubbard

The complaint of the above named plaintiff respectfully shows to the court that he intermarried with the above named defendant on or about the 20th day of September 1849 and the partners then became husband and wife; that the said partners have resided in the State of Wisconsin more than five years previous to the date of this complaint; that some time within the month of March 1861, the said defendant deserted the plaintiff without just cause, and has not since, and continually does refuse, to live with the plaintiff as his wife.

Wherefore the plainfiff demands the judgment of the court, that the plaintiff be divorced from the bonds of Matrimony existing between the partners to this suit, dated June 15th 1864.

E. Kellogg
OT Ward
Ptffs Attys

State of Wisconsin
Walworth County

Julius Hubbard of lawful age being duly sworn deposes and says that he has heard read the foregoing complaint, that the same is true of his own knowledge except as the those matters which are therein stated to be upon information and belief & as to those matters he believe it to be true.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of June AD 1864.

The court records show that J. Elisabeth Hubbard was served with a copy of the complaint on 15 June 1864 and was given 20 days to answer. Records show that she had failed to appear as of 14 July 1864.

Circuit Court , Walworth County
Julius Hubbard
agst
J. Elizabeth Hubbard

This cause coming on to be heard before the court vis its order, and, it appearing by the admission of service enclosed on the summons and complaint on file vis this action, that the said Summaries & complaint were served more than twenty days since upon the said defendant, and it appearing by the affidavit of O.F. Weed one of the plaintiff's attorneys that no answer or [demands?] have been served vis this action, or appearance made therin, and the court having heard the proofs of the plaintiff and being satisfied that the facts stated vis the said complaint are true, on motion of E. Kellogg and O.F. Weed plaintiff's attorneys, ordered and adjudged that the bonds of Matrimony existing between the said plaintiff and the said defendant be and the same are hereby declared to be void, and the same are herby annulled and set aside forever; and the partners hereto are hereby permitted to marry the same as though they had never been married.
By the court
David Noggle
Judge
Dated July 14th 1864
at Elkhorn, Walworth County; Principal=Julius Augustus Hubbard6 
Marriage*6 Sep 1864 Methodist Parsonage, Geneva, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Stephen Smith , at the Methodist Parsonage, pronounced the marriage.; Principal=Lord Nelson Rowe9,3,16,17,18 
Residence1870 Hudson/Lyons, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Household in the 1870 census:

Roe, Lord 36, Farmer born Vermont
Roe, Joannah E., 38, Keeping House, born NY
Roe, Jessie, 5, born WI
Roe, Lucy, 3, born WI
Roe, Guy N., 7/12ths, born WI
Roe, John, 65, Farmer born NH
Hubbard, Willie, 10, at home (at school)
Watson, David, 63, Glasscutter born NY (might be Waterson?)
Adams, Angeline, 66, without occupation, born NY19 
Residence1875 Brookfield, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA20 
Residence1880 Willow Lake, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; The 1880 census indicates that she was suffering from Erysipelas at the time of enumeration. She was enumerated twice...once in Willow Lake and again as a "visitor" with her Adoptive mother in Redwood Falls.21 
Residence1885 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; Age 48, born in New York22 
Residence1895 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota; Age 62, born in New York23 
Residence1900 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA; Census indicates that she is the mother of 9 children, of whom 1 is deceased.9 
Misc*13 Aug 1904 Minnesota; Widow's Benefit Pension Application Filed.24 
Residence1905 Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, USA25 
Residence1910 1127 Liberty, Spokane, Spokane Co., Washington, USA; Age 78, widow, mother of 9 children of whom 7 are living. Bron in New York. Both parents born in New Hampshire.26 
Residence28 Dec 1911 Spokane, Spokane Co., Washington, USA8 
Residence1915 227 Everett Ave, Hillyard, Spokane Co., Washington, USA5,12 
Death*23 Feb 1915 Hillyard, Spokane Co., Washington, USA; Cause of death: chronic myocarditis. Doctor answers question about duration: "I don't know."

Informant for death certificate is Mrs. A. Johnson, 227 Everett Ave, Hillyard, WA.5,12 
Burial*26 Feb 1915 Greenwood Memorial Terrace, Spokane, Spokane Co., Washington, USA; Fannie's mother sleeps in Riverside Cemetery, in Spokane, Washington, right under the flag she loved so well and wrote so many beautiful poems about and read at the Women's Relief Corps in Redwood, of which she and my mother were staunch members and supporters. (CW Buxton)5

Family 1

Julius Augustus Hubbard b. 2 Dec 1830, d. 17 Nov 1912
Marriage*5 Sep 1849 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York; Evelyn Burlingame lists marriage date as 4 September 1849.

JEAHR: My foster parents immigrated to Wisconsin and Walter and myself went along I was first married in that fall and so of course my husband went also. As I was born in 1831 it made me a young and green wife, and my husband was only 20 so we were not very capable to get on very well in the world ? only a boy and girl, and our future which is well known by all should be an example for those who come after against early marriages.; Groom=Julius Augustus Hubbard11,12,13 
Divorce*14 Jul 1864 Elkhorn, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Circuit Court, Walworth County
Julius Hubbard
agst.
J. Elizabeth Hubbard

The complaint of the above named plaintiff respectfully shows to the court that he intermarried with the above named defendant on or about the 20th day of September 1849 and the partners then became husband and wife; that the said partners have resided in the State of Wisconsin more than five years previous to the date of this complaint; that some time within the month of March 1861, the said defendant deserted the plaintiff without just cause, and has not since, and continually does refuse, to live with the plaintiff as his wife.

Wherefore the plainfiff demands the judgment of the court, that the plaintiff be divorced from the bonds of Matrimony existing between the partners to this suit, dated June 15th 1864.

E. Kellogg
OT Ward
Ptffs Attys

State of Wisconsin
Walworth County

Julius Hubbard of lawful age being duly sworn deposes and says that he has heard read the foregoing complaint, that the same is true of his own knowledge except as the those matters which are therein stated to be upon information and belief & as to those matters he believe it to be true.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of June AD 1864.

The court records show that J. Elisabeth Hubbard was served with a copy of the complaint on 15 June 1864 and was given 20 days to answer. Records show that she had failed to appear as of 14 July 1864.

Circuit Court , Walworth County
Julius Hubbard
agst
J. Elizabeth Hubbard

This cause coming on to be heard before the court vis its order, and, it appearing by the admission of service enclosed on the summons and complaint on file vis this action, that the said Summaries & complaint were served more than twenty days since upon the said defendant, and it appearing by the affidavit of O.F. Weed one of the plaintiff's attorneys that no answer or [demands?] have been served vis this action, or appearance made therin, and the court having heard the proofs of the plaintiff and being satisfied that the facts stated vis the said complaint are true, on motion of E. Kellogg and O.F. Weed plaintiff's attorneys, ordered and adjudged that the bonds of Matrimony existing between the said plaintiff and the said defendant be and the same are hereby declared to be void, and the same are herby annulled and set aside forever; and the partners hereto are hereby permitted to marry the same as though they had never been married.
By the court
David Noggle
Judge
Dated July 14th 1864
at Elkhorn, Walworth County; Principal=Julius Augustus Hubbard6 
Children

Family 2

Lord Nelson Rowe b. 16 Dec 1837, d. 8 Jul 1904
Marriage*6 Sep 1864 Methodist Parsonage, Geneva, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Stephen Smith , at the Methodist Parsonage, pronounced the marriage.; Principal=Lord Nelson Rowe9,3,16,17,18 
Children

Citations

  1. [S8] Evelyn Burlingame., A Genealogical History of the Hubbard Family and Allied Steele and Rowley Families (Unpublished 1975),.
  2. [S127] MN Health Department Death Record Card / Goodhue Co., MN, 1901 lists F.V. Hubbard's mother as: Lizzie Adams.
  3. [S180] Author Unknown, Brief "Adams" Genealogy (unpublished notes in possession of Dixie Hansen), Date Unknown,.
  4. [S189] 1875 Minnesota State Census,.
  5. [S223] Joannah E. Row, Death Certificate 1673, 1 March 1915,.
  6. [S328] Julius Hubbard J. Elizabeth Hubbard, WI, (14 July 1864).
  7. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911, p 1.
  8. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  9. [S6] 1900 US Census,.
  10. [S22] 1850 US Census, Wisconsin,.
  11. [S8] Evelyn Burlingame., A Genealogical History of the Hubbard Family and Allied Steele and Rowley Families (Unpublished 1975), Burlingame lists Julius' marriage date in Mt. Morris, NJ - but does not name his wife. It remains to be proved that the bride in this 1849 marriage was Lizzie Adams.
  12. [S329] Lord N. Rowe; Certfificate # 595111; U.S. National Archives.
  13. [S551] Frances "Fannie" (Rowe) Buxton to Marian (Wright) Smith. 12 December 1944, Fullerton, California. (2008 / Barbara (Walls) Hanson).
  14. [S22] 1850 US Census, Wisconsin, LaGrange, Walworth Co., WI, Page 44.
  15. [S18] 1860 US Census, WI, Page 2, Palymrya, Jefferson Co., WI.
  16. [S184] Redwood Falls Reveille, Redwood Falls, MN (30 August 1901),.
  17. [S185] Redwood Falls Reveille, Redwood Falls, MN (15 July 1904),.
  18. [S329] Lord N. Rowe; Certfificate # 595111; U.S. National Archives. Certificate of this marriage is included with the pension application file, as are several affadavits attesting to it (including one by Lord N. Rowe).
  19. [S337] 1870 US Census, Hudson (Lyons), Walworth Co., Wisconsin, Page 17 & 18.
  20. [S3] Edward W. Day, One Thousand Years of Hubbard History 866-1895 (Harlan Page Hubbard, NY),.
  21. [S190] 1880 US Census, MN,.
  22. [S182] 1885 Minnesota State Census, Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota; Page 5.
  23. [S183] 1895 Minnesota State Census, Redwood Falls, Redwood Co., Minnesota, page 5.
  24. [S188] Lord N. Rowe; Application # 811,916; Certificate # 595,1111.
  25. [S192] 1905 Minnesota State Census, MN, FamilySearch.org,.
  26. [S94] 1910 US Federal Census, Eden Precinct, Spokane, Spokane Co., ED 195, Sheet 17A.

John Adams1

M, b. 6 September 1692, d. 1727
FatherSamuel Adams1 d. 1694
MotherMary Meeker1
Employment* Blacksmith of Greenwich2 
Birth*6 Sep 1692 3 
Death*1727 Greenwich, Connecticut3 
Probate*5 Sep 1727 Administration granted to widow Elizabeth, 5 Sept. 1727.2 

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.
  2. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 7.
  3. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6-7.

Joseph Adams1

M, b. circa 1740, d. 18 May 1826
FatherAbraham Adams d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams d. 1789
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Frank Valentine Hubbard
Biography* JAF: When summer came we had a delightful visit to my fathers native place at Redding, where my grandfather Adams lived. He lived a few miles from the* village on a farm and he was a pleasant easy going old gentleman. He had bright blue eyes and red hair. My Uncle Harry lived near by and they were all thrifty Yankee farmers.

My grandfather used to love to tell stories of the doings of the Adams family, and he really thought they could not be beat at anything. He often told us about his cousin John Adams, who was one of the first presidents and also of his son John Adams who was also at one time president of the United States.2 
Birth*c 1740 History of Redding, CT: Died 18 May 1826, age "86 years."1 
Baptism1740 3 
Residenceb 1759 Boston, Massachusetts, USA1 
Residence1760 Fairfield, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; History of Redding: Joseph Adams removed, when a young man, from Boston to Fairfield, and married soon after, Joanna Disbrow of Fairfield. About 1760 he removed to Redding and settled in Lonetown on the farm later owned by his grandson, Stephen.1 
Residence*a 1760 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA2,1 
Marriage*9 Sep 1761 Fairfield, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; The Families of Old Fairfield gives date as 9 Sept 1761; Principal=Joanna Disbrow2,1,4,3,5 
Death*18 May 1826 1,3 

Family

Joanna Disbrow b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829
Marriage*9 Sep 1761 Fairfield, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; The Families of Old Fairfield gives date as 9 Sept 1761; Principal=Joanna Disbrow2,1,4,3,5 
Children

Citations

  1. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S210] Michael S. Disbrow., Descendants of Thomas and Mercy (Holbridge) Disbrow (Disbrow Family Association, 1992),.
  4. [S204] Town Records of Redding, Fairfield Co., CT,.
  5. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 11.

Joseph Adams1

M, b. 27 August 1770
FatherJoseph Adams1 b. c 1740, d. 18 May 1826
MotherJoanna Disbrow b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829
Biography* JAF: My Uncle Joseph was a very honest man, and he could not be tempted to tell a lie. One day he was driving a very fine horse along the road and he met a man, who stopped him and asked if that horse was for sale. My uncle said, "Yes sir." "'What price do put on him?" the man asked him, "is he honest and gentle?" said the stranger. "No he is not," said my uncle, "As he has many bad ways and mean tricks and he is balky also, I doubt if he would work for you at all" said my Uncle Joe. The man made up his mind that no man would run down his own horse, and was only talking to get around his offer of selling him. He had taken a great fancy to the horse and he was a mate to one he owned. He told my uncle he would give him 150 dollars for tile horse. My uncle told him, "You will be very much disappointed in the animal, and he will balk when you attempt to ride him." The man thought after he had used the horse a few days, that there was one honest man in the state, and of course he could do nothing about the bad bargain, as he had been told all about the horse, so he had to put up with it the best he could.1 
Residence* Head of Cayuga Lake, Stanford, New York, USA1 
Birth*27 Aug 1770 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA2,3,4 
Baptism28 Apr 1771 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA5,3,4 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S204] Town Records of Redding, Fairfield Co., CT,.
  3. [S210] Michael S. Disbrow., Descendants of Thomas and Mercy (Holbridge) Disbrow (Disbrow Family Association, 1992),.
  4. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 12.
  5. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.

Laura Ann Adams1

F, b. circa 1802, d. before 1880
FatherAaron Adams1 b. 22 Feb 1775, d. 22 Aug 1821
MotherElisabeth Bonesteel1 b. 17 Jan 1782, d. 29 Jul 1821
Residence* Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA2 
Residence Willsey Ville, New York2 
Residence Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA2 
Married Name Willsey2 
Biography* Joannah Adams Frank: My sister Laura was two years older than I, she had large black eyes and her beautiful hair always laid in waves over her high forehead. She was always dignified and lady like even at an early age, and I always admired her and looked up to her as a model of propriety. 
Marriage* Principal=Gaylord Willsey2 
Birth*c 1802 New York1 
Birth1802 Connecticut3 
Residence1850 Candor, Tioga Co., New York; Age 46, born in NY.4,5 
Residence1860 Candor, Tioga Co., New York; Age 58, bron in Connecticut3 
Residence1870 Candor, Tioga Co., New York; Age 68, born in New York, keeping home6 
Death*b 1880 Her husband, Gaylord, is listed as a widower in the 1880 census.7 

Family

Gaylord Willsey b. c 1806
Marriage* Principal=Gaylord Willsey2 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911, p 1.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S336] 1860 US Census, Candor, Tioga Co., New York; page 14.
  4. [S336] 1860 US Census, Candor, Tioga Co., New York; page 140.
  5. [S338] 1850 US Census, Candor, Tioga Co., New York, Page 140.
  6. [S337] 1870 US Census, Candor, Tioga Co., NY; Page 15.
  7. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, Candor, Tioga Co., New York; ED 206, page 58.

Laura E. Adams1,2

F, b. January 1861
FatherOscar Henry Adams1 b. 1833, d. c 1877
MotherLucy (?) b. Sep 1840
Married Name Turner 
Name Variation Elizabeth1 
Name Variation Libbie1 
Birth*Jan 1861 New York, USA2 
Residence*1880 Elmira, Chemung Co., New York, USA; Attending College2 
Marriage*c 1882 Principal=Edwin B. Turner3 
Residence1900 636 West Water, Elmira, Chemung Co., Pennsylvania; Age 39, mother of 6 children of whom 5 are living in 1900.3 
Residence1910 Clinton St., Bergen, Genessee Co., New York; Age 49, married 30 years, mother of 6, all living4 

Family

Edwin B. Turner b. Dec 1867
Marriage*c 1882 Principal=Edwin B. Turner3 
Children

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, Elmira, Chemung Co., NY; page 303B.
  3. [S6] 1900 US Census, Elmira, Chemung Co., New York, Ward 1, ED 8, sheet 7B.
  4. [S94] 1910 US Federal Census, Bergen, Genesee Co., New York, ED 16, Sheets 1A and B.

Lawrence Dazang Adams1

M, b. circa 1837, d. 27 March 1911
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams1 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherMary Ann Budington1 b. 16 May 1809, d. c 1844
Biography* JEAHR: There was one boy who was older than Walter, who was left in Michigan with one of my mothers brothers, Bonaparte Buddington, who went to California and left Lawrence Dezang Adams with his brother Walter but as soon as Lawrence was old enough he went away and began to shift for himself. He became lost to all of his relations in New York State.

Next in the family of Aaron and Mary Adams came Lawrence Dezand Adams who was born in Michigan while his three older brothers were born in Mt. Morris, Livingston Co,, N. Y. We knew nothing of his place of residence until a few years before the Civil War my brother Horace came to Wisconsin to see me and my family, also Uncle Jacob Frank and Aunt Joannah. When he returned to New York State he went through Michigan and after a lot of trouble he found Lawrence who had grown up to be a very nice looking young man, and was doing a good business in one of the parts of Lake Michigan where he was inspector of fish. After the war broke out we could hear nothing of him, and we began to think he had gone into the army and was killed and lay in an unknown grave. Years passed away, and it was in the year 1904 that. I had a letter from my brother Horace who lived at Oswego, N.Y. saying he had news that our brother Lawrence was alive and lived at Belleville Ontario. It seems after the war which he was in, that he married and went to Belleville Ontario, Canada. They had but one child a daughter, who was 40 years old and married to Robert Leonard for many years. She felt a great desire to know if her father had any relatives in any place, and she read in a paper that a lady in some place in Connecticut was getting up that is called a "family tree" of the Adams. family. My brothers daughter Alice had a number of names sent to her upon her writing to this woman and asking for some names of people of that name. She wrote to many of them and one was Harrison Adams and it was her grandfathers brother as it proved. She wrote to him, but he had been dead many years and had only one son living. He took the letter and read it and sent it to my brother Horace so we found out all about our missing brother. In the summer of 1905 1 went from Minnesota to visit my daughter Minnie Smith and as had got that far, I went on to Belleville in Ontario and found my brother and his wife and daughter Mrs. Alice Leonard.? I had a good visit on the first and last time I ever met my brother. My brother Horace came up from Oswego and we all met at my brothers and I have not seen Horace for forty years.

When I last saw Horace, he was a good looking young man and when I met him at Belleville, he was a little old man whom I should never have known, had I met him at any place. In the year 1911 my brother Lawrence and his wife both passed away, and I was so glad that I went to see them once, also their daughter Alice, wife of Robert Leonard.
1 
Employment* Inspector of Fish1 
Name Variation Lawrence DeZeng 
Name Variation Charles; Marriage Certificate of Alice Adams and Robert John Leonard apparently indicates that her parents were Charles and Lottie Adams. Perhaps Lawrence also went by Charles??2 
Marriage* Principal=Lottie (?)2 
Birth*c 1837 Michigan, USA; Carol Stuart has death certificate. it indates that he was 74 years old and time of death in 1911.1,3 
Residence1850 Flint, Genessee Co., Michigan, USA; Age 13
In the 1850 census Lawrence Adams is enumerated in the home of his Uncle, Napoleon Boneapart Buddington in Flint, MI. John Buddington, same household might be another Uncle:

Napolian B. Buddington     27     Farmer     RE: $400     born NY
Sarah Buddington          22                              born NY
Martha J. Buddington     4                               born MI
Dela A. Buddington          2                               born MI
Alice A. Buddington          4/12                          born MI
John D. Buddington          23     Farmer     RE: $300     born NY
Almira D. Buddington     21                              born NY
Lawrence Adams          13                              born MI4 
Residence*1904 Belleville, Ontario, Canada1 
Biography1905 Belleview, Ontario, Canada; Summer of 1905, Reunion Story:

Although there is no source citation, I suppose that this article was published in a Belleville, Ontario Newspaper in the Summer of 1905. It came from Jim Buxton's files and was a retyped manuscript, so I have not seen the original. Lizzie was 73 at the time of the reunion and Lawrence was about 67.

Relatives meet after 60 Years
Belleville Man Finds A Sister He Had Never Known
A Story As Strange as Anything in Fiction

An extraordinary case of the meeting of a brother and sister, who had never seen each other, took place in this city on Saturday last when Mrs. L.N. Rowe, of Redwood Falls, Minn. Arrived on the important mission of seeing her brother, Mr. Charles Adams [sic - actually Lawrence Adams], whom she had never seen. The following is the history of how they became separated when children and how the reunion came about as told by Mrs. Rowe herself to the Ontario.

The Sister's Story

We do not always have to look through the wonderful books of story or song to get to the true romance of life, as in this meeting of a brother and a sister who never saw each other. There is a chain of circumstances that had kept them apart for many years. Truth is sometimes stranger than fiction and we can only wonder at the chance of fortune and how it could possibly be that members of one family could grow up to old age without ever meeting, even by chance. In the year 1833, a young and thrifty farmer by the name of Aaron Adams bethought himself to leave the landmarks of the Empire State and try his fame and fortune in the wild forests of Michigan. Thinking it was a poor place to take his little daughter and small son, they were left with two of his sisters who had no children of their own. So taking with them their baby boy, they emigrated to the wood and in that home was born a boy who met his sister after a lapse of 60 years. The little girl went with her foster parents to the ___ state and lived there for many years.

The little boy grew up to be only a few years old with his three brothers when his mother died and his father took these brothers of his back to his sisters in New York and left him with an uncle of his mothers. This uncle went to California and died there leaving the boy among strangers and to the mercy of the wide world, who grew up without the knowledge of having a sister and brothers. His father went to Wisconsin and died without learning of his son's lonely condition. He grew to manhood and began for himself the occupation of a fisherman. His love for the water was inherited from his grandfather, who was an old sea captain. His home for many years was the storm swept waters of Old Lake Michigan, where he owned a fine fishing boat and a fishing outfit of his own and on one dark day a terrible storm arose and he with two men were tossed about by the wind and waves, which capsized his craft and they drifted for 70 miles and at last came to shore. His life was saved by his hair freezing to the side of the boat and kept his head out of the water when he was so nearly gone that he could not help himself. H was so grateful to that noble shock of hair that he did it the honor of wearing it long ever after.

By this time he was so discouraged with the loss of his property that he went to New York and as the Civil War was just begun and and Lincoln was calling "for three thousand more" , this young patriot enlisted in a company of light artillery. After long months of hard service, having been wounded and suffering with rheumatism, he procured a furlough and returned to his old place of residence.

After a time he came with his wife and little daughter up the lake and landed at the beautiful village of Belleville, attracted to the river and the blue waters of the bay where he could sail his boat in comfort while keeping to his favorite occupation of a fisherman. He made this place his home. After his daughter, who is now Mrs. Alice Leonard, grew to womanhood and married and made a home of her own, she was trying to find some relatives of her father's family, if any were living. One day she read in an eastern paper of a lady who was making out a family tree of the different people by the name of Adams. She wrote to this lady and received from her the addresses of some names of that family in the state of New York. She wrote to one Harrison Adams but it seems he ha been dead many years. He had one son living who took his father's letter and read it to a cousin of his, one Horace Adams, who lived in Owego and he proved to be her father's own brother. A correspondence was opened at once and she learned that he had another brother in Toledo Ohio, and a sister in Redwood Falls, Minn.

Now comes the sequel to this glad meeting, last Saturday morning, when she came from her home in Minnesota to find him. It was a sad chain of events that kept them apart for 60 years, and for the first time they met, and clasping hands, while tears of joy were running, they stood and looked at each other too much affected to speak. The day was all too short which was spent sitting side by side, recounting to each other the story of their long lives. She told him of her family grown up and away from home, some on the prairies of North Dakota and others off to the Pacific Coast. Of her life companion whom she traveled with on her life's journey for 40 years, and then that he was a veteran of the civil war and a member of the old iron brigade of historic fame. The new found brother told of incidents of his life and the wonderful escapes from death on the water. He recounted one of his fishing expeditions on White Island on Lake Huron, when the ice came down and flooded the land so that they only were saved by clinging to the rocks, and as soon as possible they took to their boats and drifting for two days without food they at last took their chances of reaching the main land by walking from one ice pack to the other, where after a terrible journey of many hours they at last reached the end of their perilous journey.

She also gave him an account of his ancestors and that he came from a long line of statesmen and patriots. That his great-grandfather and his brothers did grand service in the war of the Revolution and one of them was an aid to General Geo. Washington, and they were own cousins to old John Adams, one of the first presidents of the great republic. That his grandfather was in the war of 1812 and was afterwards elected as a member of the Legislature from his district in New York. He served one term when DeWitt Clinton was Governor, and when the bill was voted on as to the idea of digging the ditch for the Erie Canal, the fist name called was Aaron Adams, and he rose an in his honest convictions that it never could prove a success, he loudly responded "nay". The sister had heard her Aunt's stories of their early life in Ulster county, where their father was a slaveholder and how when his suit of clothes was gotten up to travel to Albany the good wife was assisted by the black woman who spun and wove the cloth and made those fashionable knee breeches and long waist coat by hand and he also wore ruffled shirt fronts with his shoes with silver buckles and his hair braided and tied with a black ribbon. He went with his own carriage and driven by his black man, Prince.

The brother and sister were also glad to have news that their brother in Oswego was coming next week to join them, and all that was left of the family would be together. The brothers have met once but the sister has not seen her brother since the year 1859 [??]. So the hours of this happy day passed away all too quickly and the evening shadows came on while they sat recalling the olden days gone by, and at last it was late at night before they separated for their rest.

It may be possible that this will be their last reunion on earth, as the faltering steps and fast whitening locks should remind them that they are fast traveling to the other shore. They can surely take this comfort to their hearts, that in that home beyond where eternal youth shall be their portion of joy, they shall meet again and never be separated. (by and by)
5 
Death*27 Mar 1911 Boonville Village, Oneida Co., New York, USA; Pneumonia1,3 
Burial* Belleville, Ontario, Canada; Body returned from Oneida NY to Belleville Ontario.3 

Family

Lottie (?)
Marriage* Principal=Lottie (?)2 
Child

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S248] Free Note:, Unsourced one-sheet summary of information about Alice Adams and Robert John Leonard from Carol Stuart; Thornhill, Ontario, Canada; April 2004.
  3. [S198] Carol Stuart Dixie Hansen. 2001, 30 Shieldmark Cr; Thornhill, Ontario, Canada L3T3T5.
  4. [S209] 1850 US Census (Michigan),.
  5. [S378] Belleville Ontario Newspaper (presumed and only from retyped transcript)., Belleville, Ontario (Summer 1905),.

Lottie D. Adams1

F, b. circa 1872
FatherHorace Buddington Adams1 b. c 1835, d. a 1905
MotherMary Elizabeth Webster1 b. c 1842, d. 16 Jan 1921
Birth*c 1872 New York, USA2,1 
Residence*1880 Owego, Tioga Co., New York, USA1 

Citations

  1. [S371] 1880 US Federal Census, ED 215, Page 242C.
  2. [S152] Civil War Pension Application Index Card / Ancestry.com.

Lydia Adams1

F
FatherAbraham Adams1 d. 11 Jun 1761
MotherElizabeth Williams1 d. 1789
Married Name Crow1 
Marriage* Principal=Arnon Crow1 

Family

Arnon Crow

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 9.

Mary Adams1

F
FatherNathanial Adams1 b. 27 Jan 1778
MotherLucinda (?)1 b. c 1781
Note* Apparently Nathan had a daughter who married Jared Patchen and came to Walworth Co. in 1847. I'm not sure if that daughter is the same as "Mary", the daughter mentioned in the Two Joannahs Memoirs.2 

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S411] James Ellis., LaGrange Pioneers (Reprinted August 1995 by the Walworth County Genealogical Society (originally published by the LaGrange Ladies Aid Society, 1935)),.

Mary Jane Adams1

F, b. 21 October 1841, d. 23 January 1843
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams2 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherMary Ann Budington1 b. 16 May 1809, d. c 1844
Birth*21 Oct 1841 Genesee Co, Michigan, USA; Birth date figured from age at death of 1 year, 3 months, 23 days.3 
Death*23 Jan 1843 Genesee Co, Michigan, USA; JEAHR: Then there came another letter telling of their little girl Mary who was two years old and always was well until the day she died. She was taken with fits and they could not save her life.

From a letter written by little Mary's grandmother, Rhoda Buddington:

she has been called to part with her little mary Jane she was like a rose that had gust begun to bloom and blushed with the frost but so it is and it is the work of God and we must not repine She was a little idol for all of the fameley she was to pretty to live in the world Mary said she was willing to give her up becaus she never had been able to tak any care of her and she did not know that she ever would be she sufered but a short time she was perfectly well to all apearance Sunday untill about four-o Clock in the afternoon at 5 she was taken in fits and never come out of them untill a bout four in the morning then mortification had taken place she died at seven monday morning She was small of her age but very smart never had been sick any of any consequence she died the 23 of January aged one year 3 months and twenty three days1,3 

Citations

  1. [S180] Author Unknown, Brief "Adams" Genealogy (unpublished notes in possession of Dixie Hansen), Date Unknown,.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S268] Mary Buddington Adams 1836-1843,.

Nathan Adams1

M, b. 1660, d. 1749
FatherEdward Adams1 d. 1671
MotherMary (?)1
Marriage* Principal=Mary James1 
Marriage* Principal=Jane Blackman1 
Marriage* Principal=Anna (?)1 
Birth*1660 1 
Death*1749 1 

Family 1

Anna (?)

Family 2

Jane Blackman

Family 3

Mary James

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.

Nathan Adams Jr.1

M, b. 1824, d. 1850
FatherNathanial Adams1 b. 27 Jan 1778
MotherLucinda (?)1 b. c 1781
Marriage* Principal=Rachel (?)2 
Birth*1824 2 
Death*1850 2 
Burial* Round Prairie, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Died of cholera1 

Family

Rachel (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  2. [S411] James Ellis., LaGrange Pioneers (Reprinted August 1995 by the Walworth County Genealogical Society (originally published by the LaGrange Ladies Aid Society, 1935)),.

Nathanette Adams1

F
FatherNathan Adams Jr.1 b. 1824, d. 1850
MotherRachel (?)1
Note* Guy G. Prentice, guardian1 

Citations

  1. [S411] James Ellis., LaGrange Pioneers (Reprinted August 1995 by the Walworth County Genealogical Society (originally published by the LaGrange Ladies Aid Society, 1935)),.

Nathanial Adams1,2

M, b. 27 January 1778
FatherJoseph Adams2 b. c 1740, d. 18 May 1826
MotherJoanna Disbrow2 b. 6 Jan 1739/40, d. 5 Nov 1829
Death* Heart Prairie, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA2 
Biography Dixie Hansen notes: There is an error in the biography of Nathan Adams which was published in the LaGrange Pioneers. Namely, the "daughter" (Joannah Elizabeth Adams) who married J.A. Hubbard were not Nathan's daughter, but rather was his grandniece. Walter Adams, mentioned as a probable relative, was Joannahs' brother and Nathan's grand nephew.

The article:
The Adams family that came from New York to LaGrange in 1845 sprang from the "Braintree" branch as did Pres. John Adams. Nathan Adams, Sr., born in 1778, and his wife, Lucinda, (1787-1855); and Nathan, Jr., and wife, Rachel owned the northern half of Sec. 24 with the exception of the Fearnley farm. Nearly all good memory of these people is lost but their name still clings to the locality in which they settled. It is said that when a name was chosen for the first post office of their neighborhood the choice was between Porter and Adams. The latter was decided on in honor of John Quincy Adams and his local kin. There was also another son, Horace, and a daughter who married J.A. Hubbard. Another daughter, Mrs. Jared Patchen, with her family came in 1847. Mrs. Celia Patchen Nickerson told her sister, Minnie, that when her Grandfather Adams bought the lots in the Round Prairie Cemetery she remembered that he told her father he had bought enough for his own family and the Patchen's, too. If Nathan's senior, remains lie there, no marker is there to give the date of his death. Nathan Adams, Jr., (1824-1850) died at 26 years of age. He left a widow, Rachel, and a daughter, Nathanette; (Guy G. Prentice, guardian). His farm, the Geo. King place, was sold to John Bottrell, and wife, Lavina Serena B. Walter Adams who attended the Hill school during the fifties, must have been a relative.3 
Biography Michael S. Disbrow: One of the founders of the Adams Settlement near Danby, Tomkins Co., NY. (this needs to be researched - as other evidence, including the Two Joannah Memoirs and the 1850 US Census, make it very clear that Nathan and Lucinda settled in Walworth Co., WI 
Biography* JAF: They were a very musical family and I thought no one could play the fiddle any better than my father. His brother Nathan and his son Nathan were fine musicians and used to play for dances. Uncle Nathans children had all grown up when he immigrated with his son Nathan to Wisconsin, driving a team from Spencer in Tioga County New York State clear through to Wisconsin, and settled on Heart Prairie in Walworth Co., where he lived many years. I presume there are yet many living amongst the old settlers who have tripped "the light fantastic Toe" after the inspiring music of the Severance and Adams band. Uncle Nathan was also a good scholar in arithmetic and algebra and liked to have people come to him with sums and problems for him to make out. He had but one great fault (that was his love for ardent spirits), and he would not play for a dance until he had a drink or so. He had a large family of boys and girls and after they were grown up, the boys used to talk to him to try have him break off as they were really ashamed of him. His wife, Aunt Lucinda used to put a stop to their talking to him about drinking and say "You'll never make half so decent a man as your father." Strange to say, none of the boys ever touched liquor of any kind, and were honest temperate men and respected by all. The old people lived to be very old, and after Aunt Lucinda died, Uncle Nathan went to New York to visit his daughter Mary. They were strong Baptists, and used to have their family prayers after he had gone to bed, thinking he would not enjoy hearing them. He said to Mary one day, "Why do you wait until I am in bed before you have your prayers?" Mary said "Why, Father, I thought you would not care to hear them." He said, "Well don't do that any more." Strange to say, although he was over 80 years old, he experienced religion and became a member of the Baptist church and stopped drinking and was a sober good Christian church member until his death which took place a few years later, on Heart Prairie, Wisconsin. When he passed away, his remains were laid by his wife Lucinda, and his son Horace and Nathan who died of cholera many years before. They lie in the old burying ground on Round Prairie Walworth Co., Wisconsin.2 
Burial* Round Prairie, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA2 
Marriage* Principal=Lucinda (?)2 
Birth*27 Jan 1778 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA; 1850 census lists birthplace as Scotland. 1860 cenus and all other evidence suggests that it was actually Connecticut.1,4,5,6,3 
Baptism6 Sep 1778 Redding, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA7,6 
Residence*1850 LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA; Other household members in 1850 census: James Wiley and Adaline E. Wiley both age 22; Sam'l Ellis, age 25; Amanda Ellis age 18; James H. Adams, age 4; Chas E. Ellis age 4 months.4 
Residence1860 LaGrange, Walworth Co., Wisconsin, USA1 

Family

Lucinda (?) b. c 1781
Marriage* Principal=Lucinda (?)2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S18] 1860 US Census, WI,.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S411] James Ellis., LaGrange Pioneers (Reprinted August 1995 by the Walworth County Genealogical Society (originally published by the LaGrange Ladies Aid Society, 1935)),.
  4. [S22] 1850 US Census, Wisconsin,.
  5. [S204] Town Records of Redding, Fairfield Co., CT,.
  6. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 12.
  7. [S194] Charles Burr Todd, The History of Redding Connecticut From Its First Settlement to the Present (Newburgh journal Company, Newburgh, NY 1906),.

Oscar Henry Adams1

M, b. 1833, d. circa 1877
FatherAaron Bonesteel Adams2 b. 1806, d. 19 Jan 1865
MotherMary Ann Budington1 b. 16 May 1809, d. c 1844
Biography James M. Buxton relates: My Grandmother Fanny Rowe Buxton told me about her Uncle Oscar. He is shown on the family chart. Anyway this Uncle Oscar apparently became a sea-faring man, and travelled the world on cargo ships. One of the things that he accumulated was a little monkey in one of these far off ports, and he would take the monkey along with him on all of his travels. As time went on the monkey became a problem, so when he came back home he took the monkey to the local zoo. (city here is unknown). He left the monkey with the zoo keepers, but Uncle Oscar would return to visit the monkey during the times he came back into his own home port. The little monkey would recognize Oscar and would run up to the bars of the cage and reach his arms through to give Oscar a big hug. Apparently on one of these visits, a neighboring gorilla to this little monkey witnessed this hugging exchange, and reached through the bars of his cage with his long arms grabbed Oscar and proceeded to give Oscar a big hug. They had to get the zoo keepers to come and pry the gorilla's arms off before Oscar could get himself free.

Probably not of much interest in a genealogical study of a family, but my Grandmother would get a big laugh out of this every time she would tell the story.3 
Employment* Surgeon2 
Biography* JEAHR: My brother Oscar Henry Adams was from his earliest boyhood a natural doctor and also had a love for the sea and his spare time when out of school was spent in making ships and fixing pills and medicine to put in his little tin trunk. When he was old enough Uncle Gaylord Willsey sent him to New York City to study medicine. He did not stay there long but put out to sail away, first to Cuba and afterward to go as supercargo on a ship to China. After he had roamed about the world until he was satisfied he took up his studies again, and went to France and got his diploma there. The Crimean War had broken out and he enlisted as a Surgeon on the greatest ship that then sailed the Atlantic. The French hired this ship "The Great Republic" of the United States to carry soldiers out to the seat of war and bring the wounded back. He was also a Surgeon in the Civil War in a New York regiment. He was cut on the head with a saber in the hands of a guerrilla when helping to gather the wounded on a battlefield. He saved his life by making the Free Masons sign, and guerrilla chief was a Mason too, and he took him to his place and cared for him until he was well. He was married before he went into the army and had two children: one boy Arthur and a girl, Elizabeth but always called Libbie. About a years after he came back from the war he opened an office at Elmira N. Y. and practiced medicine a number of years. While treating a man for a malignant cancer he caught that awful cancer for which there has never been found a cure. It broke out on his cheek and he told his folks there was no help for it, but they insisted on his having it cut out, So to please his wife Lucy he went to Rochester and had it cut out but it soon grew again, and eat into his mouth until his teeth all dropped out, and then into the grain and he died in great agony with his hands raised up to Heaven. Just in the prime of life, only about 44 years old and I had not seen him in nearly 30 years but he sent me messages he told his wife on every breeze that blew westward. I shall see him when I cross over to the other side and' we shall have so much to tell each other of our life on this earth.
2 
Marriage* Principal=Lucy (?)2 
Birth*1833 Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, USA; Joannah last saw her brother Oscar in 1849 when he was 16 years old. That puts his birth date about 1833.2 
Death*c 1877 Elmira, New York, USA2 

Family

Lucy (?) b. Sep 1840
Children

Citations

  1. [S180] Author Unknown, Brief "Adams" Genealogy (unpublished notes in possession of Dixie Hansen), Date Unknown,.
  2. [S193] Memories of Joannah Frank (supplemented with the memories of her niece, Joannah Elisabeth Adams Rowe),An unpublished manuscript, circa 1911.
  3. [S227] James M. Buxton to Dixie Hansen. 2001, Buxton: 445 5th St E; Kalispell MT 59901.

Rebecca Adams1

F, b. 30 August 1702
FatherDaniel Adams1 b. 17 May 1679
MotherRebecca (?)1
Married Name Stevens1 
Marriage* Principal=William Stevens1 
Baptism*30 Aug 1702 1 

Family

William Stevens

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.

Samuel Adams1

M, b. 19 March 1703/4, d. 13 February 1782
FatherDaniel Adams1 b. 17 May 1679
MotherRebecca (?)1
Marriage* Principal=Deborah (?)2 
Baptism*19 Mar 1703/4 1 
Death*13 Feb 1782 Danbury, Connecticut1 

Family

Deborah (?) b. c May 1702, d. 2 Feb 1794

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.
  2. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 7.

Samuel Adams1

M, d. 1694
FatherEdward Adams1 d. 1671
MotherMary (?)1
Appears on charts:Pedigree for Frank Valentine Hubbard
Marriage* Principal=Mary Meeker1 
Death*1694 1 

Family

Mary Meeker
Children

Citations

  1. [S397] Donald LInes Jacobus., History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Reprinted Two Volumes in Three with Additions and Corrections to History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (originally pulbihsed as a Supplement to the American Genealogist, October 1948) (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976, 1991), page 6.

Sarah Adams

F, b. 3 September 1743
Married Name Ayer 
Birth*3 Sep 1743 Rowley, Massachusetts1 
Marriage*12 Oct 1769 Plaistow, Rockingham Co., New Hampshire; Groom=Daniel Ayer1 

Family

Daniel Ayer b. 28 Jan 1743, d. 6 Jun 1805

Citations

  1. [S69] Natalie Gagnon to Dixie Hansen. 4 October 1999, 38 Prescott St.